5

Since demigods are allowed I propose Herakles (accidentally) killing Kheirôn/Chiron. Kheirôn was the immortal son of the Titan Kronos and therefore a half-brother of Zeus. When Herakles was battling members of the Kentauroi/Centaurs of Mount Pholoe he accidentally wounded Kheirôn. The problem was that the arrow that pierced Kheirôns was poisoned with Hydra ...


3

There's a nice little book by Malcolm Davies (St John's College, Oxford) titled "The Greek Epic Cycle", which deals exactly with what you are asking for. Here's the table of contents of the edition I have: The Epic Cycle The Titanomachy The Oedipodeia The Thebais The Epigoni The Cypria The Aethiopis The Little Iliad The Sack of Troy The Returns ...


3

Out of interest of spreading information, I'm copying here the answer I wrote yesterday to this question on Judaism.SE, with a few alterations: A possible answer: Maimonides on the mishnah states that this was done as part of worship of Baalim. The city of Baalbek, which was originally a Baal center of worship, eventually became a center of Bacchus (Dionysus ...


2

This got too long for a comment, so I hope it's all right to post here. The Writing in Margins blog is mine, so I'd like to offer a few addendums. It's always hard to disprove something rather than prove it, but I really haven't found any books of Welsh folklore that mention corgis as fairy steeds. There's Giraldus Cambrensis' Itinerary of Archbishop Baldwin ...


2

This is most likely a recent invention by Corgi breeders & enthusiasts. From "Did fairies really ride corgis?": The earliest source I can find is the poem "Corgi Fantasy" by Anne G. Biddlecombe of Dorset, England. She was one of the top Pembroke breeders of the 1940s and 1950s, and a founding member of the Welsh Corgi League in ...


2

No - this is a gross "gamification" of Qi to something similar like mana in other RPGs. You cannot "start with zero Qi" in Daoism, believed to be a vital force forming part of any living entity. Without Qi, you would be dead. Elemental travel is borrowed from 五行 (wuxing), in particular 形意拳 Xinq Yi Quan. It is a very common "...


2

Martin West's Loeb volume Greek Epic Fragments collects all the available fragments for the Titanomachy and a short introduction (2 paragraphs) on it. This is also where you'll find all the available fragments for early Greek epic.


2

There are literally hundreds of books on the topic, but the best one for serious work is Timothy Gantz's Early Greek Myth. This book goes through the earliest sources for the myths and chronicles their development over time. He even covers artistic representations. I would not necessarily call it an "introduction," as it is a proper academic ...


2

I'd posit: The Bull of Heaven Slain by Gilgamesh. Gilgamesh is a demigod, but very specifically mortal. Heracles, by contrast, is deified as an Olympian once he burns away his mortal flesh.


2

The Pahulu gods on Lanai, one of the Islands of Hawaii, were all killed by a prophet called Kaululaau. Since this myth is recorded only a few centuries ago from an oral tradtion, we don't know exactly how old it is, but it is possibly from as early as the first century CE.


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