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In Homer's Illiad, in the conflict between Athena and Ares, Athena puts on the cap and becomes completely invisible to Ares. Then Pallas Athene grasped the lash and the reins, and against Ares first she speedily drave the single-hooved horses. He was stripping of his armour huge Periphas that was far the best of the Aetolians, the glorious son of Ochesius. ...


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Hebe Hebe was the cup-bearer and poured ambrosia and nectar of the gods. You might know her better as the wife of Hercules, who upon his ascension to Mount Olympus "got" her from his enemy and her mother Hera as reconciliation. "Now the gods at the side of Zeus were sitting in council over the golden floor, and among them the goddess Hebe (Youth) poured ...


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Some famous stories: Demeter and Persephone, as already mentioned by Malady Clytaemnestra and Iphigenia (Euripides' Iphigenia in Aulis) Hecuba and Polyxena (Euripides' Hecuba)


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In the book Odyssey, it's said that ambrosia was carried to Olympus by doves [1]: Here not even a bird may pass, no, not even the timid doves that bring ambrosia to Father Jove, but the sheer rock always carries off one of them, and Father Jove has to send another to make up their number Also, Demeter was considered the goddess of crops and ...


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Actually, while the evidence is fragmentary and confusing, it points more to their having been separate, and then merging together. There are several elements contributing here to the identification. There were the interpretatio graeca and also the interpretatio romana in which Greeks and Romans respectively interpreted another culture's gods as their own ...


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One can perhaps approach it from a perspective of the history of science and think about how the people at the time would have understood the physics of seeing and light. You ask the very good question: "if the shield did become invisible because he was carrying it, how could he use it? Could he himself see it (and the reflection in it) even though it ...


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According to Anacreon, white roses appeared in the foam of the sea around the shell of Aphrodite's birth. The birth account of Aphrodite is first recorded in Hesod's Theogony. We all know this account from classic paintings, but what is perhaps less known is that Aphrodite was not the only one born from the casting of Ouranos' genitals in the sea by his son, ...


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Nymph, as the word νύμφη (nymphe) indicates, are originally from Greek mythology, not Roman. It's a word that encompasses some very different entities of varying levels of god-likeness, so there is no "one fits all" answer to your question. If we focus on the type of entities that modern Westerners usually associate with nymphs, that is, manifested ...


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Heracles supposedly conquered Rome and freed a Titan. Hesiod's Theogony and Aeschylus' Prometheus Unbound both tell that Heracles shot and killed the eagle that tortured Prometheus (which was his punishment by Zeus for stealing fire from the gods and giving it to mortals). Heracles freed the Titan from his chains and his torments. Prometheus then made ...


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Mediaeval compilations referencing older, potentially ancient works do mention the story. It is narrated in Ch. II of the "Διηγηματα" section of the "Appendix: Narrationum," on p. 359 of Anton Westermann's 1843 book Mythographoi: Scriptores poeticae historiae graeci. Cited as the source here is the Progymnasmata 2, by Aphthonius of ...


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Epimetheus: His name literally means afterthought. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epimetheus The brother of Prometheus, he never thought about the consequences of his actions, but instead reacted to things as they occurred. He and Prometheus were entrusted with the box containing all the evils of the world, and Epimetheus was warned by his brother not to ...


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Original 219-222: His quidam signis atque haec exempla secuti esse apibus partem divinae mentis et haustus aetherios dixere; deum namque ire per omnes terrasque tractusque maris caelumque profundum. The word deum here is 2nd genitive masculine plural, so should be translated as of the gods. Rhoades (1841-1923) has been described as "a conventional ...


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Unfortunately, Varro's Antiquities is only known through references like this one. Searching for #abeon in the Packhum corpus (a collection of, theoretically, all surviving Latin literature before 200 CE) gives no results, and #adeon gives only false positives. So it seems no references to them survive from classical times. So the best information we have on ...


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Zeus' thunderbolt in ancient times was often depicted as a single weapon. It was usually depicted as a winged flaming staff with lightning wrapped around it (although the lighting then was different from the zig zag we use today, it's got more right angles). You can see this in the heraldry of the Roman legions and into the Middle Ages in heraldry. Here's a ...


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In the period before Judaism became monotheistic, each city had its own deity. Remnants of this can be found in the Old Testament, for example: El Bet' el (Gen. 31:13; 35:7) El 'Olam (Gen. 21:33) El Ro'i (Gen. 16:13) El 'Elyon (Gen. 14:18) El Saddai (Gen. 17:1) all later taken to be Yahweh after Moses, were all originally separate city gods worshipped by ...


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Be careful not to rely upon translations which need not be word for word accurate. I always thought it was a Victorian British error to call Apollo a god of the sun not an original BC era phenomenon. I am unaware of any example where Apollo is the sun god in a Greek text. Ovid Met. 1 might call the father of Phaeton "Phoebus" which is a nickname ...


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Googling Vulcan and Tubalcain has revealed a wealth of information: The McClintock and Strong Biblical Cyclopedia writes: "The derivation of the name is extremely obscure. Hasse (Entdeckungen, 2, 37, quoted by Knobel on Ge 4:22) identifies Tubal-cain with Vulcan; and Buttmann (Mythol. 1, 164) not only compares these names, but adds to the comparison ...


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Mother (Demeter / Ceres) losing Daughter (Persephone / Proserpina) to Son-in-law (Hades / Pluto)? And causing Winter / Summer seasons because of it in the end? ... I feel like this should close due to lack of research, sorry. This is one of the common stories of mythology collections, I think?


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As far as I'm aware, almost certainly not. There is no such index dedicated especially and specifically to whether any two (or more) characters from the mythology interact with each other (or with one another) or not. I would say that the best one could do in approaching something approximate to this would be an encyclopaedia, in the use of which sometimes ...


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I suggest you take a look at Nails for the dead: a polysemic account of an ancient funerary practice by Silvia Alfayé. The paper focuses on the use of nails in Roman funerary practices, but in section 3 she offers a nice overview on the ritual/magical uses of nails in general, including the inscribed bronze nails you are asking about, which she describes as: ...


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The story of Clytemnestra and Iphigenia is one possibility that I know of. Iphigeniawas the daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra in Greek mythology. While the Greek army was preparing to set sail for Troy during the Trojan War, Agamemnon caused the anger of the goddess Artemis, because he killed a sacred deer. So, she decided to stop all winds, and the ...


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Demeter was the goddess of the harvest and often put on banquets for the gods and sometimes mortals. You also have Pan who was worshipped as the "party god" and/or Dionysus God of the vine.


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I would like to refer to a contemporary version of the myth - Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Lightning Thief. Where victims and all of their possessions are turned into stone. Secondly, consider the following link, with Latin version (translated to English using Google Chrome Translate extension): https://latin.packhum.org/author/959 - though I ...


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