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Complicated Well, it definitely doesn't claim to be folklore at all, it was just in a book by Thomas Nast. (Linked full size image is over 7 MiB; Wikimedia Commons page; image is in the public domain) Santaclausville, N[orth] P[ole] Another example related to Nast is by George P. Webster: "His home through the long summer months, you must know, Is ...


5

Santa Claus is derived from the Dutch festival figure St Nicholas, or Sinterklaas. The story is that St Nicholas is a Roman Catholic bishop who rides over the rooftop on a white horse at night, accompanied by his black manservant. While the children are asleep they bring presents, throwing them through the chimney, or the manservant climbing down the ...


3

There are two streams of narrative in the Santa Claus story, and thus two "appearances". The first, of course, is the historical. Not exactly on-topic here, but you can research the historical figure, Nicholas of Myra, who was a bishop of that city in the third century. Known for his charity, he was recognised as a saint by the Church. Historically, he was ...


3

One of the original holidays that was merged together to create the modern Christmas is Yule (in Scandinavian languages, Christmas is still called "jul" or "jól"); this was apparently celebrated around midwinter; the term to "drink yule" appears in the poem Hrafnsm%C3%A1l dated to the 10th century, but it is unclear exactly what the celebrations would have ...


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