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9

To my knowledge Baba Yaga was never the Hero (the character who we typically refer to as the protagonist) in any of the stories I have heard. Nevertheless, here is an academic reference that I've found while looking it up since this piqued my interest. Your answer lies at the bottom. Vladimir Propp was a Soviet folklorist and scholar who analyzed the basic ...


8

This is the abstract a paper published in an (apparently) respectable academic journal (2010): the russian original 'planetnik' is rendered as 'hobgoblin': In the regions of Orawa and Podhale, among the local elders, beliefs about hobgoblins , able to bring or mitigate thunderstorm, survived up to this day. The hobgoblins are supposed to travel on ...


8

Hejkal, Čatež, Jezinka. One is a black man completely coved in moss, lichen, grass and bracken. Very often with animal like claws and other features, such as small horns, or patches of fur or a tail. Germans probably took this myth and created Schrat. In more modern depictions, influenced by western culture it is a big fur ball with thin hands and legs. ...


4

In terms of whether lunar deities in general tend to be connected to the moon, my high-level sense is that this is not the case per se, though I'd have to do more digging to be more definitive. However, In terms of why lunar deities may be connected to the moon: Lunar calendars predate solar calendars Therefore: The earliest methods of tracking when ...


3

Sir James George Frazer cited this story from the 1873 book Russian Folk-Tales by William Ralston Shedden-Ralston. Ralston, in turn, translated it from Ivan Khudyakov's 1861 collection Russian Fairy Tales, where it was numbered 109. Clearly the story is Russian in origin. Ralston did not give the story a title, which probably indicates that neither did ...


3

So as @Nuloen The Seeker pointed out, Baba Yaga has a role as gardian of the dead and the underworld (The french Wikipedia seems to be the most complete one on Baba Yaga, maybe because more of Vladimir Propp work were translated in French). There seems to be a possible association between Baba Yaga and Morana the goddess of winter, found on Slavorum: ...


3

Well, sources for Scandinavia during that period are generally scarce, so it is hard to say for sure. Most of Denmark, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, as well as the other colonies in the northern Atlantic, were at that point rather firmly Christian. There are a few practicers of pagan worship from later centuries, including the late 15th century churchthief ...


3

I did some more research and found an article that references where Gaiman pulled some of the information from. As @Drakonoved mentions Chernobog is the god of darkness, misery, etc. in Slavic myth and that there is no specific reference to a hammer. The article from Radio Times expands on this further: There is no particular mythic connection between ...


3

In Slavic mythology, the image of Chernobog is not associated with any type of weapon, including a hammer. Chernobog is the embodiment of evil, darkness, misery etc. Some scientists reconstructed a pair of Belobog/Chernobog, who are opposed to each other as "light/dark", "good/evil", "happiness/misery". Chernobog, hummer and other Gods, thing and creatures ...


3

Домовой lives in almost every home. Most often he may be found where several generations of the family lived. To reveal his presence is difficult, but if a home is not happy, he will certainly show his displeasure. He is able to protect against many misfortunes: fires, scandals, theft, ill-wishers or foes. However, if a family start show disrespect to their ...


2

I'm afraid there isn't a lot we know about Simargl. What we do know is that he was part of Vladimir's pantheon, as mentioned in the Russian Primary Chronicle: Vladimir then began to reign alone in Kiev, and he set up idols on the hills outside the castle with the hall: one of Perun, made of wood with a head of silver and a mustache of gold, and ...


2

The name of the book is The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion, by Sir James George Frazer. The title of the chapter (number 66) is The External Soul. The name In Slavic Stories lets you know it takes place in the Slavic region. As for translation, I believe the story takes place in Russia.


2

Any form of speculation onthe Slavic mythology is based on reconstruction. There are absolutely no written records, apart from foreign ones, or some descriptions of the opponents of these beliefs (Christian opponents) describing the Deities et al. Some were retained in folklore, usually as names of tribes of various spirits/daimons etc. There were various ...


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