14

The Sophocles version is the canonical one, for several reasons: It was written first, and has been preserved in it's complete form. There is some disagreement about what actually happens in the Euripedes version. I hate to use Wikipedia as a source, but this particular one is well cited, largely from this text. I struggle to consider a source canonical if ...


8

While the passage in question is unreadable through Google Books, I fear you've just misunderstood the translation. This is the part, right? http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.01.0188%3Acard%3D1339 That's not her brother. She has but one brother, Orestes, and the "guardian" is actually the pedagogue (paidagōgos).


4

Since Sophocles wrote first, his account is perhaps the "most canonical"; it seems not even the Oedipodea mentions Antigone's actions (as Gantz attests). However, ancient Greeks didn't really think of mythological accounts in terms of "canonicity" until very late. Playwrights were free to change the narrative at will and often did so. For us, since ...


2

The frontispiece to George Steiner's 1989 Antigones is a quote from J. Lempriere's 1797 A Classical Dictionary, "Antigone, a daughter of Oedipuus, king of Thebes, by his mother Jocasta. She buried by night her brother Polynices, against the positive orders of Creon, who, when he heard of it, ordered her to be buried alive. She however killed herself before ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible