10

Australian Aboriginal myths in some regards are a little unique in the sense that many of their creatures are derived from the traditions of Aboriginal Dreamtime. A word of caution: many of these creatures are derived from the traditions of Aboriginal Dreamtime. To understand them, the reader must have a decent understanding of what the Aboriginal ...


9

If you're looking for a summary of what the ancient poets wrote about, your best bet would be to look at Pseudo-Apollodorus' Bibliotecha. The Bibliotecha is a work that collates nearly all of Greek mythology into a single, coherent narrative, including the Labors of Heracles. If you want an even quicker summary, there's also Hyginus' Fabulae, but you'll ...


8

That claim according to which there was a Sabine month called Flusalis can be found in a footnote of William Warde Fowler's The Roman festivals of the period of the Republic; an introduction to the study of the religion of the Romans (p.92). Here is the complete footnote: Steuding in Myth. Lex. s. v. Flora. There was a Sabine month Flusalis (Momms. Chron. ...


6

Apollodorus' Epitome 1.24: Theseus, arriving in the realm of Haides [Hades] with Peirithous [Pirithous], was thoroughly deceived, for Haides on the pretense of hospitality had them sit first upon the throne of Lethe. Their bodies grew onto it, and were held down by the serpent's coils. Now Peirithous remained fast there for all time, but ...


5

The quote within the quote in your Question is Book 5, Lines 255-258 of Ovid's Fasti. The full story runs from Line 229 through Line 260 of the same book, making up a medium-sized paragraph. (James George Frazer's translation thereof, which might make for less obscure reading than the one in the Kersey Graves book, can be found on The Theoi Project. A.S. ...


5

You can find this one, certainly not the best, but a good one, and as free as you like.


4

The description of Acheron and Styx in Aeneid 6 appears to be fairly clearly based on the somewhat ambiguous Underworld structure supplied by Circe in Homer's Odyssey 10. Other mythography subsequent to Homer likewise appears to take Circe at her word as far as the placement of these chthonic features is concerned. E.g. Plato's interpretation, given in ...


4

One source mentioning the rivers is Book X of the Odyssey: So I spoke, and the beautiful goddess straightway made answer: ‘Son of Laertes, sprung from Zeus, Odysseus of many devices, let there be in thy mind no concern for a pilot to guide thy ship, but set up thy mast, and spread the white sail, and sit thee down; and the breath of the North Wind will ...


4

Because the internet hold a great deal of misinformation and disinformation, for obscure mythologies your best bet is scholarly work. (Folklorists and academic researchers.) Books You'll want to look for books on the subjects. Be cognizant of the author and their background, and the time period of the work. (Older anthropological work may not be current ...


4

The following work on Freemasonry gives a broad overview of its historical development: from its origins in the era of Solomon's Temple up to the 19th century, with an emphasis on Freemasonry's plans of the past few centuries for the destruction of the Catholic Church: Msgr. George F. Dillon's Grand Orient Freemasonry Unmasked (audiobook)originally entitled:...


4

The translation by Peter Fisher, with an introduction and commentary by Hilda Roderick Davidson, is easy to find, and reputable.


4

If you are interested in Summerian mythology you can check out the Oracc Project here: Link to the Oracc Project


4

Here are some other sources for Greek and Egyptian myths: THEOI.com for Greek mythology Ancient Egypt Online for the Gods and Goddesses Egyptian Gods and Goddesses Ancient Egypt, the section on Pharaonic Religion


4

The Man He is supposed to be one of the earliest kings of Egypt; he also supposedly conquered the entire world, says the story, "all the way to Okeanos [Oceanus]." Most English translations of his name, starting sometime in the 20th century onwards, seem to favour spelling it with a transliteration closer to Θοῦλις than "Thulis" is; so it ...


4

Not Alone In the Odyssey, in fact, Kirke [Circe] does not live all by her lonesome on the island of Aiaia [Aeaea]. In Book 10, Odysseus says that Kirke's house is tended to by certain wood-nymphs, who "come from groves", and by a couple of varieties of water-nymphs, who "come from springs" and "from the sacred rivers flowing seawards". It is unspecified ...


3

Sadly, I've never been able to find any direct references to Mathonwy anywhere. Bromwich (pg. 439) mentions that the name Mathonwy itself could be a doublet for the name Math, like so many names in Culhwch ac Olwen are. If so, Mathonwy may never have represented a specific character. One final thing worth mentioning is that it's unclear whether Mathonwy ...


3

The only book I have is Douglas Gifford's Warriors, Gods and Spirits from Central and South American Mythology (illustrated by John Sibbick). This book is part of the The World Mythology series, which includes books about, well, mythologies from around the world (non-exhaustive, I'd say). The book is not specifically about Aztec myths, but has a whole ...


3

There is a Dutch folktale about a hunter who waits for a giant hare. Here is a tentative translation: A hunter once had heard rumors about an extraordinarily large hare, which every night around midnight came to a certain field in the region, and some strawlers claimed the animal was bulletproof: no one could hit this giant hare. One night, the hunter ...


3

There are two that you can download from Project Gutenberg for free. Armenian Legends And Poems by Z. C. Boyajian (2017) Armenian Legends And Festivals by L. A. Boettiger (2011)


3

It would be helpful if you could link to the article. High level answer without seeing the article would be the Upanishads for India, and the Book of Songs for China. In terms of the Mesopotamian material, that is very old indeed, but difficult to link directly to existing cultures. Nevertheless, the Gilgamesh is believed to be the earliest surviving ...


3

>File Not Found!< From what I've been able to find, there is no ancient source which tells such a story about Aidepsos (the commonly older transliteration of the town's name, which is Latinised as Aedepsus). It seems that this "legend" has been cobbled together from a random grab-bag created by eclectically appropriating a variety of sources talking ...


2

I recently read Kenneth Davis' book titled Don't Know Much About Mythology. Well compiled and a breezy read about various mythologies ranging from Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Greek, Roman, with a sprinkling of Celtic, Indian, African, and Pacific(Australian) thrown in at the end. Would be a good starter, before you venture into detailed texts.


2

    Homeric Hymn to Demeter 1-3 (A.N. Athanassakis translation) No Ancient Greek source that I have come across explicitly mentions Hades asking for Persephone. In one way or another they all say simply that Zeus gave Persephone to his brother, and that the giveaway method was the fairly common worldwide practice of bride-kidnapping, which in some ...


2

One source is Strabo, who calls the hot springs of Edipsos the "hot waters of Heracles" in Geography 9.4.2.


2

Edit: +1 - Thanks for the search...it's 'under my skin' and has me in personal review mode. On the spiritual path, these connections are gold. Not sure how "deep" these stories are [Unless you meant deeply embedded in human nature]. They seem to be longer expressions of the age-old saying, "Cut off your nose to spite your face", meaning, "hurt oneself in ...


2

Okay, this might be something: The OAHSPE Bible mentions Crite three times: "Thoth sent the following message to Looeamong, to wit:...But, behold, I labor against Gods who have the advantage of me. The Chine'ya rebel Gods and the Vind'yu rebel Gods, that fled from the Triune kingdoms in the east, have taken upon themselves names popular with mortals. ...


1

The central problem is your source author, not the most reliable in the world (compare him to Robert Graves). He is writing in 187x, that is a LONG time ago His methods of investigations were questionable His use of sources is problematic Checking the source Demonstration with the "his history is curiously illustrated in the sculptures, made seventeen ...


1

As you say, first page result of googling 'Thassos and sirens' brings two touristic websites, but they seem rather dubious. The first one mixes sirens with mermaids: According to an ancient myth, Thassos was the island of the Sirens, the devilish women with a fish tail. It is said that they had such a beautiful voice that every men who heard them ...


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