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2

To expand slightly on the answer by @Semaphore. In her An Encyclopedia of Fairies Hobgoblins, Brownies, Bogies, and Other Supernatural Creatures (page 159), after the Somerset rhyme, Katharine Mary Briggs adds: Tolkien is faithful to folk tradition in the ogre-ish behaviour of Old Man Willow. Indeed, J.R.R. Tolkien would often draw from English folklore in ...


3

This is not an account per se, but it is a source that proves such a belief existed in English folklore. Katharine Mary Briggs documents a Somerset rhyme that goes: Ellum do grieve, Oak he do hate, Willow to walk, If yew travels late Dr. Briggs explains that the folksong embodies traditional beliefs that: . . . if one elm tree is cut down, the one next ...


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The closest thing to what you are asking that comes to mind is Old Norse Religion in Long-Term Perspectives: Origins, Changes & Interactions (I'm including the Google Books link because there you can find the ebook for a rather cheap price). It's a collection of papers by some of the leading scholars in the field of pre-Christian Norse religion. The ...


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