Hot answers tagged

13

Apollo didn't have any solar properties in Homeric times, and he and Helios were clearly distinct entities. Helios is extensively discussed in Book XII of the Odyssey, for example. From the 5th century BCE and onwards Helios started to be identified with Apollo. An early reference to the fusion of the two beings can be found in fragment 781 of Euripidis' ...


6

We should perhaps first note that vampires are hardly the only creatures that can not stand sunlight; it is a common attribute among mystical creatures that they only appear at night, and that some of them die in sunlight (we can take as examples Grendel of Beowulf, and the Chinese jiangshi, a creature that originally was a reanimated corpse that died when ...


4

If you're looking for a Doylist answer, as it were, vampirism is linked to the actual disease porphyria. Someone with chronic porphyria develops blisters after being out in the sun for a short amount of time. A number of the symptoms of chronic porphyria can be linked to the classic appearance of vampires. I don't have any suggestions for a folklore-based ...


4

A quadriga Pseudo-Hyginus, Astronomica 2. 13 (trans. Grant) (Roman mythographer C2nd A.D.) : Sol [was the] first among the gods made use of the quadriga [4 horsed chariot]." Wikipedia A quadriga (Latin quadri-, four, and iugum, yoke) is a car or chariot drawn by four horses abreast (the Roman Empire's equivalent of Ancient Greek tethrippon): and you ...


4

As far as the sun is concerned, the answer is: Yes... but also No. For somewhat different reasons, this gets very complicated and even confused particularly with regard to three of the classical seven planets in question, namely the sun, the moon, and Venus. Sun and Moon In ancient Greco-Roman cosmology, as celestial objects themselves, the sun and the ...


2

Yes, that is the case. In Ancient Greece, sun-worship personified by Helios had once been prevalent and powerful among the people of the pre-Hellenic culture, but very few of the communities of the later historic period retained it as a potent factor of the state religion. According to Roman sources, the worship of the sun personified by Sol was introduced ...


2

So far as I know the Greco-Roman myths about the sun consistently refer to it as an object, usually the wheel of a chariot which is handled by Apollo or Helios. The Greeks didn't personify or anthropomorphize the sun.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible