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21

The source of the story is the Þrymskviða poem (The Lay of Thrym), which is included in the Poetic Edda. It was Thrymr, king of the jötnar, who stole Mjölnir. He then demanded the gods allow him to marry Freyja, in order to return it. Thor travelled to Jötunheimr to claim back his hammer, and he managed to sneak in dressed as a bride. Loki wasn't ...


19

Yes, it seems so. In the Prose Edda, when Thor is presented with the hammer by Brokkr, this property is in the description (Page 147, here): Then he gave the hammer to Thor, and said that Thor might smite as hard as he desired, whatsoever might be before him, and the hammer would not fail; and if he threw it at anything, it would never miss, and never ...


18

As said already, your story is taken from Þrymskviða. There's a retelling of the story named The Children of Odin, which refers to that in a more easily comprehensible way: The actual story does not say that Loki stole the hammer from Thor. Then when they were far from Jötunheim Thor missed Miölnir, missed the hammer that was the defence of Asgard and ...


12

I love this story! According to good ol' Wiki, which is sourced, this story comes from an Icelandic rímur cycle. It is also cited in the Gylfaginning. Your story and the rest of it are from the third and fourth rímas, emphasis mine: As Thor and his companions approach Útgarða-Loki's fotress they face a strong locked fortress gate (v. 3-6). Unable to ...


10

This seems to be a somewhat distorted version of a story from Gylfaginning, in which Thor, Loki and Tjalvi travels to Útgarða-Loki, a jotun and sorceror, who presents Thor, Loki and Tjalvi with different challenges, among which is that Thor should empty a horn with mead. Thor makes an attempt, but ultimately fails. After several other failed tasks, and a ...


9

Direct quote from the wikipedia article of Mjölnir hammer of Thor, a major Norse god associated with thunder. Mjölnir is depicted in Norse mythology as one of the most fearsome weapons, capable of leveling mountains. In his account of Norse mythology, Snorri Sturluson relates how the hammer was made by the dwarven brothers Sindri and Brokkr, and how its ...


9

AFAIK, there is actually nothing that explicitly says that he can fly, even when he uses his chariot. Þrymskviða, verse 21, describes how he goes to Jotunheim: Then home the goats | to the hall were driven, They wrenched at the halters, | swift were they to run; The mountains burst, | earth burned with fire, And Othin's son | sought Jotunheim. This ...


9

The 11th century Christian missionary Adam of Bremen wrote, "Thor, they say, presides over the air, he governs the thunder and lightning. the winds and rains." The Norse believed that during a thunderstorm, Thor rode through the heavens on his chariot pulled forward by the goats Tanngrisnir ("gap-tooth") and Tanngnjóstr ("tooth grinder"). Lightning ...


9

As you say Snorri Sturluson writes this cited text in the prologue to his Prose Edda, one of our chief sources of Norse mythology. The old Scandinavian worshipers did not have a written language comparable to that of Latin of the Roman church. As such we have next to nothing about the Norse myths written by Scandinavians who were actively telling these myths ...


8

Blood and poetry. Before I go any deeper, I want to clear up a misconception: Thor is not really a god of thunder. Yes, he does generate it, but his main function is as guardian against the forces of chaos (which goes directly against how gods of thunder storms are portrayed in some RPGs). The main sources for the worship of the Norse gods are the ...


8

No, those weapons are inventions of the comics. We do have a couple of stories in which Thor can not use Mjölnir. In Þrymskviða, the hammer has been stolen by the giant Thrym who demands the hand of Freya in order to give it back. Thor is dressed up in bridal clothing to retrieve his hammer, so it is difficult to say whether the apparent lack of other ...


7

The bet didn't call for flawless creations; Sindri and Brokkr just had to do better than the sons of Ivaldi. After that, Loki went to those dwarves who are called Ívaldi's Sons; and they made the hair, and Skídbladnir also, and the spear which became Odin's possession, and was called Gungnir. Then Loki wagered his head with the dwarf called Brokkr that ...


7

Thor's "ride" fits with his role as god of the common people. While most of the gods ride horses, Thor drives a wagon, or walks. (He walks across Bifrost, the rainbow bridge, according to the Prose Edda.) As for the goats, I'm just guessing here, but there's a verse in the poem Havamal, which is supposed to be the widsom of Odin himself: One's own ...


7

Snorri’s tale of the goats’ being being magically reconstituted after being eaten for meat is of a common type of mythic motif, a fantasy cherished by a people who know hunger intimately. (Compare Ojibwe myths featuring a tiny kettle that proves an inexhaustible cornucopia of manoomin [that’s “wild rice” to us chimooks]; a more ...


6

Thor can take a lot, but he is not invulnerable The best example of this is in the story of Hrungnir. In the duel with the obnoxious giant, Thor's hammer Mjölnir collides with the whetstone Hrungnir uses as a weapon. The whetstone splits in two, and one part hits Thor in the head, and gets stuck there. The Völva Groa tries to use her galders to get it out, ...


6

If you look in Faulkes' translation of the Poetic Edda the story can be found on pp. 96-7, in the section of Skaldskaparmal that explains kennings for gold. The story begins when Loki cuts off the hair of Thor's wife Sif and has to appease the angry thunder-god. (A link to another translation. Scroll down to section XXXV.) Loki goes to the sons of Ivalde, ...


5

He uses his chariot to fly, not his hammer though. Thor had a chariot to travel across the sky, which was drawn by two giant goats: Tanngniost and Tanngrisnir. source I've never seen anything of Thor flying with Mjolnir. Doing a quick google search yields the same... However, the mythical version doesn't let Thor fly if he twirls it super fast. ...


3

It looks less weird in the context of a version of the Auriga mythology involving goats. Part of Auriga are the Haedi, the two goat kids.


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