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36

A 'god' is synonymous to a 'deity'; the Titans and Titanesses were gods, they were members of the second order of divine beings - after Gaia and Uranus, and the other primordial deities. Cronus and his fellow Titans comprised the second Ancient Greek pantheon (the first comprising of deities such as Ananke, Gaea, and Ouranos), which the younger generation ...


25

The Greek Gods have their own hierarchy/timeline going on. First were the primordial deities, the first beings in existence, which included Uranus and Gaia. Then, descended from the primordial deities were the Titans, which included Chronos and Rhea (Zeus' parents). Note that the Titans were still deities. According to Wikipedia: Among the first ...


23

According to Hesiod, by the time the Olympians came to power, Golden man had vanished. Hugh G. Evelyn-White's translation of Works and Days (from ellopos.net) describes them as (ll. 109-120) First of all the deathless gods who dwell on Olympus made a golden race of mortal men who lived in the time of Cronos when he was reigning in heaven. And they lived ...


13

You can't just take it back after humans have it, unless you destroy all the humans. Zeus, of course, considered this option on a few occasions, such as after his deeply disturbing run in with Lycaon, and even tried it with a deluge. In this case, Zeus opted for a punishment he considered worse than death. (This is a common theme in Ancient Greek divine ...


13

There used to be a theory that the Titans were actually the gods of the inhabitants of (geographical) Greece before the Greeks invaded and took it over. The idea there is that the story of Titanomachy is actually an allegory for the Greek takeover of their modern homeland. This theory was popular enough back when I was in school 3 decades ago that it was ...


12

OK, so there are a couple of misconceptions here. First, as Codosaur has already pointed out, Cronus and Chronos aren't necessarily the same being -- they just have similar names. On the other hand, Cronus and Chronos were confused with each other even in antiquity. In fact the Roman god Saturn, who the Romans associated with the Greek god Cronus, was ...


11

The following text is from the wiki: Atlas and his brother Menoetius sided with the Titans in their war against the Olympians, the Titanomachy. When the Titans were defeated, many of them (including Menoetius) were confined to Tartarus, but Zeus condemned Atlas to stand at the western edge of Gaia (the Earth) and hold up The Heavens on his ...


11

The word "Titan" is used to denote a class of mythological entities that existed before "Gods" were born and Titans are usually used to describe the creation of the world. All titans were born from Uranus (Sky) and Gaia (Earth), which were the first mythological creatures to be created when the world was formed. After them, Cronus was born, the cunning, ...


10

You are referring to the Aeschylus fragment "Prometheus Unbound". Unfortunately this play was mostly lost. (The source text can be found here: "The Prometheus bound of Aeschylus and the fragments of the Prometheus unbound" on page 145, but it won't be especially helpful unless you have some Latin and Greek.) For the Prometheus Unbound fragments on Theoi, ...


10

First of all, never get your mythology from Youtube comments. Second, the second comment is the accurate one. Χ in Greek is transliterated as ch, and that's where we get our time words from (as they mention). I believe the first comment is just confused, where the user once read what the second person is saying, but got it exactly backwards. In both cases ...


8

I gave an answer on this subject; They held the corners of the earth originally, before Atlas did. There are no primary sources from Theoi about his subject, which means, that, there are none. They give a little about its origin... The cosmic story of five Titanes--four holding the corners of heaven--may be Phoenician in origin. The six Titans, 4 ...


8

If we only consider humans cultures, there is not really any human culture before the gods of Olympus came to power. Prometheus is the one that created humankind and then gave them fire (which represents the superiority of humans over mere animals), as written here: PROMETHEUS was the Titan god of forethought and crafty counsel who was entrusted with ...


8

According to the Theoi Project, Hyperion, Krios, Koios and Iapetos--were posted at the four corners of the earth to hold Sky fast, even though that was only for the murdering of their father, they were each rewarded a corner of the earth.


7

It is used in both these ways. Among the Ancient Greeks and Romans, just as in almost any other culture or language in the world, especially in the neighbourhood of the Mediterranean Basin, if a descriptive title or nickname gets enough usage, not surprisingly, it coagulates into something that, for all intents and purposes, is "a proper name." William ...


6

The Titans overthrew the primordials, the first beings that came into existence. More specifically, according to Hesiod the Titans, lead by Cronos, castrated Uranus (personification of the sky) at the behest of Gaia (personification of the earth): (ll. 147-163) And again, three other sons were born of Earth and Heaven, great and doughty beyond telling, ...


6

As far as I can tell, the modern-day theory for the connection between Phoenician gods and the Greek Titans coms from Atlantis, the Antediluvian World, written in 1882 by Ignatius Donnelly. Donnelly attempted to draw parallels between several different mythologies and historical accounts, and in doing so prove that the lost continent of Atlantis actually ...


6

It's not uncommon for Greek myths to have several variations, and it's not always possible to reconcile different versions of a myth. The Atlas and Perseus story is a late variation of the myth of the Garden of the Hesperides that appears in Book 4 of Ovid's Metamorphoses. In this version, the garden and its golden apples belong to Atlas, not Hera (who isn'...


6

Chronos and Cronus have often been confused in Greek Mythology. The first is the personification of time in pre-Socratic philosophy and later literature. The second is the Titan deity who was defeated by his son Zeus.


5

Younger, but not by much. Chiron was conceived when Zeus was still a baby, and while Cronus was hunting his youngest son by Rhea. Cronus and Rhea were still living together as husband and wife during Cronus's clandestine union with Philyra. (Some interpretations I have read have it such that it was against Philyra's will.) There was an island in the Black ...


4

BRIEF Herakles [Heracles] never engaged in combat against any Titan, neither before nor after his deification (his becoming a god). The Olympians participated in two cosmic conflicts: Titanomakhia, the "Titans’ War"; and Gigantomakhia, the "Gigantes’ War." The Titans’ War is supposed to have taken place tens of thousands of years before Herakles’ birth. ...


4

I apologize for the length of this answer, per the background--the two wars are indeed distinct, as Yannis points out. Your point about temporal contradiction is valid, (and in my experience, time can be non-linear in the Greek Myths,) but there is no easy explanation. The Titanomachy (literally "battle with the titans" from the Greek "mach-ey") was the ...


4

Well, they were forced into Tartarus. And amongst the foremost Kottos (Cottus) and Briareos (Briareus) and Gyes insatiate for war raised fierce fighting : three hundred rocks, one upon another, they launched from their strong hands and overshadowed the Titanes with their missiles, and buried them beneath the wide-pathed earth, and bound them in bitter ...


4

The story of Ophion being the first ruler of heaven is part of the Orphic tradition. Orphism stories may not always be 100% compatible with the more well known stories of Hesiod's theogony. In any case, according to Apollonius of Rhodes the transition from Ophion and Eurynome to Cronus and Rhea happened "through strength of arm": He sang how the earth, ...


4

Part of the confusion may derive from the "fuzziness" subject. Time is not strictly rational in the Greek myths, so why should proportion be firmly fixed? More confusion may be injected in regarding all, as opposed to merely some, of the Titans, being huge. Finally, there is the question of who is and who is not a Titan, and according to whom? Perspective ...


3

The Titanes and the Gigantes seem to have become one in people's minds over time, perhaps because both of them fought the Olympians. While 6th century BCE writers like Homer and Hesiod don't mention unusual size as an aspect of the Titans, other children of Uranus and Gaia were of giant size, so you can see how the confusion began. The Titan page on Theoi....


2

Before Atlas held up the sky Ouranos was still alive so basically he kept the sky from falling. But after Kronos over through, him Hyperion, Krios, Koios and Iapetos held up the sky from the 4 corners of the Earth that they were rewarded with for helping kill their father. Upon the Titans defeat, Zeus threw them into Tartarus. Then Zeus chained Atlas and ...


2

I was taught that there is a relationship between φοῖβος (brightness) and φόβος (fear). The idea is that Apollo's radiance is not gentle, but glaring like the sun. Apollo is not typically portrayed a "warm, fuzzy" character, but as uncompromising, like truth, for which he is a patron. His brightness is fearsome, deadly, and unerring, like his arrows. ...


1

The reason the Titans don't appear in many myths is because of the Ages of Man. To answer this question, you need a little backstory first. In the Golden Age, the primordial deities (first gods) ruled the world and Underworld. Gaia was the earth and Ouranos was the sky. They were mated and had many kids. Long story short, Gaia got her kids (specifically the ...


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