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The River Styx is one of the five rivers of the Greek Underworld, rivers that separate Hades from the land of the living. During the Titanomachy (the Titan war), which was fought between the Titans and the Olympians, the goddess Styx sided with the Olympians. Once the war was won, Zeus, king of the Olympians, promised that every oath be sworn on Styx's ...


17

Coins (specifically a type called an obol or obolos) were left on the body or placed in the mouths of the dead. The dead give Charon the coin, which shows they have had proper funeral rites and therefore deserve to be transported to Hades. The Aenid by Vergil, Chapter 6 has this to say Why some were ferried o'er, and some refus'd. "Son of Anchises, ...


16

Kore was the Ancient Greek word for young girl, the equivalent of our maiden, and Persephone was often referred to as such to highlight her innocence.


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Wikipedia actually has an interesting interpretation: Attempts to explain the symbolism of the rite also must negotiate the illogical placement of the coin in the mouth. The Latin term viaticum makes sense of Charon’s obol as “sustenance for the journey,” and it has been suggested that coins replaced offerings of food for the dead in Roman tradition. ...


8

Probably not. According to Apollodorus, [VI. ZEUS CONFIRMS THE DIVINE PRIVILEGES OF HERMES.] And Zeus made Hermes his personal herald and messenger of the gods beneath the earth." It says that Zeus had to make him into his personal herald, and messenger, but there's no way that [II. HERMES STEALS APOLLO'S CATTLE.] Though he was laid out in ...


8

Cerberus was the son of Echidna, a half-woman half-snake, and Typhon, a huge serpentine horror. That's a hell of a pedigree for a dog. More seriously, I imagine Cerberus had to be at least loosely based on the breeds already known by the ancient Greeks, and those were the Laconian and the Molossian hounds. The Molossian breed was more robust and fierce, ...


7

When a hero takes a trip into the underworld, it's referred to as katabasis. I've included immortals in the listing. The following are but five of many such stories in Greek myth. The god Dionysus rescued his mortal mother, Semele, from Hades. He does so by facing down Thanatos himself. Afterward, he gives Semele part of his divinity, making her immortal. ...


7

This is a complex question, and entire books have been written on it. The modern conception of Satan is a mixture of qualities arising from paganism (horns, etc.) but the conception of Satan as evil in the Christian sense almost certainly arises from Zoroastrianism in the form of Ahriman. To unpack this, consider Hades Diis. Lord of the underworld, yes. ...


6

It's probably Lake Lerna, a real (former) lake in the Argive plain. You might also know this lake from the Lernaean Hydra, the killing of which was one of Heracles' tasks. The lake has disappeared now, but here was its approximate location. (Taken from Wikipedia.) Smith's Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography sums ups its relationship to this myth: ...


6

In 1828 the Danish sculptor Albert Bertel Thorvaldsen made this piece (above), entitled Cupid Leading Cerberus. On his website the Greek Mythology Link, Carlos Parada has labelled this picture: "Cupid in the Underworld, as the Tamer of Cerberus, with Pluto’s Pitchfork". This artwork of Thorvaldsen does not seem to be based on any ancient myth but it does ...


6

The metaphor was (probably) inspired partly by Medieval literature (courtly or theological) and partly by Virgil's works, for example the "Georgics" that, in part, discusses the myth of Orpheus, who attempted to rescue his dead lover Eurydice from the Underworld. Besides this, as was already said in a comment, Dante could be influenced by the Italian ...


6

Apollodorus' Epitome 1.24: Theseus, arriving in the realm of Haides [Hades] with Peirithous [Pirithous], was thoroughly deceived, for Haides on the pretense of hospitality had them sit first upon the throne of Lethe. Their bodies grew onto it, and were held down by the serpent's coils. Now Peirithous remained fast there for all time, but ...


5

Hades main story involved the abduction of his niece, the Kore (aka Persephone), and subsequent forced marriage. So, from a modern perspective, we could say he is a bad guy. But, it's important to remember that incest among the gods is not a crime--Zeus married his own sister! Forced marriage was also the norm, certainly for nobles, until fairly recently. ...


5

As I understand it, Izanagi is the original ruler of Yomi, however, when Susanoo was banished there, he became ruler. Texts on Yomi are very scarce, and finding out exactly how he became ruler, and what later became of Izanagi, remain scarce. I'll do some investigating soon for you.


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Most Greek accounts - even the otherwise extraordinarily comprehensive mention in the Hymn to Demeter - don't mention the cause of Hades' infatuation with Persephone. I would tempted to snarkily write it off as another flight of fancy (albeit a high-profile one) by an Olympian, which happens quite often. But what's interesting is that at least on Latin - not ...


5

The only relevant thing I found on the web with the exact description is here . READY: We all have to cross the River Styx I wish I could take credit for this topic, but the truth is my friend Rev. Thomas Butts wrote something like this for his weekly column in the Monroeville paper several years ago. He kindly gave me permission to paraphrase some ...


5

As @Codosaur Pointed out, Satan is a character that rises up against the supreme deity of the mythology. I would add that in the Christian rligion, he comes by many names I'll start a list here and we'll try to explain some of their signification: Lord of the underworld / Lord of Hell / Lord of this World: Satan is supposed to rule over hell, so the ...


4

It is the mystical division between life and death - or rather, life and afterlife. It is a symbol of that border. It is definitely not made out of normal water, as falling into the Styx causes one to lose one's memories. Which is why one has to take the ferry to the other side.


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The Greeks believed that at the moment of death the psyche, or spirit of the dead, left the body as a little breath or puff of wind. The deceased was then prepared for burial according to the time-honored rituals. Ancient literary sources emphasize the necessity of a proper burial and refer to the omission of burial rites as an insult to human dignity (Iliad,...


4

In Hesiod's Theogony Cerberus was the offspring of Echidna and Typhon (on the other hand, Hesiod did call him fifty-headed, so). To back this story up, note that Euphorion of Chalcis described him as having eyes that flashed like the volcanic Mount Etna. Why would this back anything up? Because traditionally, Typhon either resided in Tartarus or was buried ...


4

https://www.greekmythology.com/Other_Gods/Minor_Gods/Adonis/adonis.html ...However, Persephone later refused to give Adonis back to Aphrodite; this led to a dispute that was solved by Zeus. As a result, Adonis would spend a third of a year with each goddess, and one third with whoever he wanted; he chose to spend two thirds with Aphrodite. ...


3

According to Diodorus Siculus, it was Herakles favour of Theseus that persuaded Hades to release him: Peirithoos now decided to seek the hand of Persephone in marriage, and when he asked Theseus to make the journey with him Theseus at first endeavoured to dissuade him and to turn him away from such a deed as being impious; but since Peirithoos firmly ...


3

I've read that when she was young she was called Core (maiden), and after she was kidnapped she changed her name to Persephone (bringer of destruction/death). I see it as a sort of coming of age thing. This is from the book (graphic novel, actually) Hades : Lord of the Dead by George O'Connor. O’Connor draws from primary documents to reconstruct and retell ...


3

To answer your question we take a look at the context of the Ferryman outside of this specific instance. In Hárbarðsljóð: "Hárbarðr" is the name of the ferryman. Hárbarðr means "Grey beard," and is another kenning for Odin. Hárbarðr repeatedly boasts of his conquests of giantesses, as does Odin in Havamal. While many scholars still may disagree on it, ...


3

I don't know about specific items or how you could fit this in your performance, but the first step for a mortal to prepare for a roundtrip journey to Hades should be to initiate themselves in the Eleusinian Mysteries. We can only speculate on the details involved, but being an initiate apparently helped Herakles to bring Cerberus up from Hades: [4.25.1] ...


3

Why These Persons? Within the story the explanation is that these men, when they were alive in the upper world, conducted their affairs with especial attention to fairness. Minos and Rhadamanthys in particular also established the first laws ever used in Greece. Diodorus Siculus says that Rhadamanthys possessed "great justice", and that Minos "ruled wholly ...


3

An early mention of the pool of Mnemosyne can be found in the Petelia Gold Tablet, an Orphic inscription from between 300-200 BC: You will find in the halls of Hades a spring on the left, and standing by it, a glowing white cypress tree; Do not approach this spring at all. You will find another, from the lake of Memory refreshing water flowing ...


3

Cerberus was known as the hound of Hades. This three headed dog was the offspring of Echidna and Typhon. He had three heads, a serpent tail, and snakes coming out of some of his body parts. The Cerberus was three headed but not all the time when written or talked about. He was related to many species that had many heads. Cerberus father had many snake ...


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