4

The concept of Hades and the realms therein evolved according to the texts that survived. There was probably never a "Hellenic Unified Theory" of the underworld and the location of its realms. Different authors give us different accounts in different eras. But as a general guideline, it's important to consider that the Greeks would have had a ...


3

When and why did necromancy became a bad thing? Probably since it was first practiced. However, there are no sources that ancient that have survived to our day. Some people would have been against it from day one because they would have thought it unholy and unnatural to the lest. The oldest literary account of necromancy is found in Homer's (12th-8th ...


2

Bans on necromancy are hardly a new thing. The Bible explicitly forbade it 3500 years ago: There shall not be found among you any one that maketh his son or his daughter to pass through the fire, or that useth divination, or an observer of times, or an enchanter, or a witch, Or a charmer, or a consulter with familiar spirits, or a wizard, or a necromancer. ...


2

Actually, trafficking with chthonic spirits could be prosecuted as impiety under Greek law by classical times. The Witchcraft and Magic in Europe's second volume, on ancient Greece and Rome, has some interesting stuff on this.


2

I'm not finding any ancient sources that explicitly mention the issue, but there is a mediaeval text called the Third Vatican Mythographer, written in Latin, and using the Roman names of the gods, which does chime in, perhaps based on a genuinely ancient tradition. According to Ch. 9, §2 of the aforementioned work, Mercury (the Roman equivalent of Hermes), ...


2

The place of suffering was found in Helheimr, and was called Náströnd, meaning "corpse shore". This is where the impure dead, like adulterers, murderers and oath-breakers were sent. It was a cave full of snakes, with an ice-cold river of venom flowing through it. These dead were fed upon by the dragon, Nidhoggr or Nidhog, “the dastardly striking”, ...


2

I would like to clear up the stereotype that surrounds Hades and makes him look like a bad guy. In modern time whenever you watch a movie or play a videogame where Hades is one of the characters they make it seem as though he is evil and I think that's based around the fact that he rules the underworld. Let's go back in time to how it was he came to be the ...


1

in greek mythology, the king of the titans, Chronos, carried a sickle. cronus, the harvesting god, carried a scythe. The grim reaper was a combination of the two and carried a sickle.


1

Short answer: no, Hor-Aha did not pre-date the first mention of the deity Horus. Long answer: Aha is according to Egyptology either: The second Pharaoh of the first dynasty, or Another name for Nemes, the first Pharaoh of the first dynasty. Regardless of whether he was the same as or the successor of Nemes, the name Hor-Ahah is what is called a 𓅃𓊁 Horus ...


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