14

TL;DR This belief doesn't come from a myth. It first appeared in The Wizard of Oz. I think the first time this belief was stated was in The Wizard of Oz rather than in any myths. The belief probably comes from older myths/customs surrounding witches that were drawn upon to create this idea for the Wizard of Oz. Water used to find witches. This took 2 forms. ...


5

As a follow-up to my (almost) namesake @Thom . And to @Spencer It is not specifically stated that they burn in water they are only afeared to cross it. Tim O 'Shanter's poem says Ah, Tam! ah, Tam! thou'll get thy fairin! In hell they'll roast thee like a herrin! In vain thy Kate awaits thy comin! Kate soon will be a woefu' woman! Now, do thy ...


2

Romanian witchcraft is (not surprisingly given the religiosity of the country) rooted in Christianity, which in its turn copied the principles of a blood sacrifice and scapegoating from Judaism. Christianity and Judaism are strongly influenced by principles of blood magic. Middle Eastern ancient religions quite often demanded bloodshed to mollify the gods. ...


2

This study should answer your question: The wizards of the violet flame. A magical mystery tour of Romanian politics - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies It presents the manifestations of irrational practices in recent Romanian politics. Providing a short history of the mystical and the occult in Romanian politics, this research uses as a case ...


2

This is a story thread in Robert Burns's poem 'Tam O'Shanter' from 1791. Tam is spirited safely by his mare Maggie to a bridge, and the pursuing witches cannot follow him across the water.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible