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To the ancient Celts, certain trees, especially the oak, ash and thorn, held special significance. To the Celts, Druids and many other peoples of the old world, certain trees held special significance as a fuel for heat, cooking, building materials and weaponry. In addition to this however, many woods also provided a powerful spiritual presence. The ...


5

Well, I know that with the Ancient Celts the tree of life was a big thing to their culture, to the extent they believed they were trees, or came from trees. They saw them as the symbol for balance, and would leave a big tree to stay on their land because of their beliefs that they were magic (as they provided a multitude of uses such as food and medicine); ...


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It's true that a world tree does not appear in mainstream Greek mythology. However the concept wasn't completely unknown to the Greeks. In fact, a world tree - and more specifically a winged oak - does appear in the few surviving fragments of the cosmogony of Pherecydes of Syros (the Pentemuchos): On the third day of the wedding, Zas (Zeus) fashioned a big ...


4

It isn't referred to in any obvious terms as a "world-tree" in the mainstream mythology, but the concept might be present in the story of the wedding of Zeus and Hera, with which Zeus' favourite illegitimate son Herakles (one of Hera's most hated stepchildren) is ultimately connected. Zeus and Hera get married at the point of transition between the end of ...


2

神檀樹 in Literary Chinese literally means: 神 (shén) : spirit / deity 檀 (tán): sandalwood / hardwood 樹 (shù): tree Translating 神檀樹 as "Divine Betula" is not supported by the characters. 檀 (tán) would have to be substituted by 樺 (huà).


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Nope, they did not get that tasty fruit that would have granted them eternal life: Now the Lord God said, "Behold man has become like one of us, having the ability of knowing good and evil, and now, lest he stretch forth his hand and take also from the Tree of Life and eat and live forever." And He drove the man out, and He stationed from the east ...


1

Yes, He warned them off the fruit, lest they die and, no, they were expelled from the garden because of their disobedience towards God's will. All of which strikes me as unfair insofar as it's akin to placing a toddler in the kitchen and saying, "here are all these delicious vegetables I want you to eat, but if you ever eat these delicious, scrumptious ...


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