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4

While I agree with much of what has been written already, I think there is one obvious aspect that has not been directly expressed. There's a lot of rape in Greek myth because rape happened a lot. The ancient Greeks were engaged in an unusually high amount of warfare, which breeds the kind of anarchy where rape is rampant. Ancient Greeks were possibly more ...


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To answer your first question yes, Hermes was (among other things) a god of thievery. An excerpt from the Hermes Theoi page HERMES was the Olympian god of herds and flocks, travellers and hospitality, roads and trade, thievery and cunning, heralds and diplomacy, language and writing, athletic contests and gymnasiums, astronomy and astrology. He was the ...


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Cold Hard Cash The overwhelmingly predominant interpretation, at least starting from the 1st century BC, is that the gold = money, although this view started out, it seems, simply as an accusation potentially made by Danae's father Acrisius in Euripides' (now fragmentary) tragedy Danae a few centuries prior to that. In what we know from other sources, Danae ...


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Distracted by the Shine Starting at least in the 1st century BC, a standard interpretation of this story has been that Danae granted Zeus her favours in exchange for gold, i.e. she was seduced by the offer of money. Recorded in the Greek Anthology, Parmenion might be earliest example of an author who contrasts the possibility of rape with the idea that it ...


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To assume that the Greeks exclusively associated natural disasters with divine anger or folly would be incorrect. For example: Thucydides gives an excellent circumstantial account of a tsunami that struck the Aegean seacoasts in 426 BCE and concludes that the cause was an earthquake (Papadopoulos and Chalkis 1984). Pliny the Elder (Historia Naturalis 2.82, ...


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Zeus' thunderbolt in ancient times was often depicted as a single weapon. It was usually depicted as a winged flaming staff with lightning wrapped around it (although the lighting then was different from the zig zag we use today, it's got more right angles). You can see this in the heraldry of the Roman legions and into the Middle Ages in heraldry. Here's a ...


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