17

In the Völuspa (part of the poetic Edda), the tale is told to Odin as a prophecy by a völva who tell him both the story of earth creation and destruction. In the Gylfaginning (part of the prose Edda), which quotes extensively the latter, the tale is told by three characters in Ásgard (Hárr, the king, Janhárr and Thridi). Presumably in the first case it ...


10

Also - in the Volsung Saga Odin demotes Brynhild because she disobeys his orders that a certain king should win in battle, and kills him instead. (He condemns her to marry a mortal.) If he can pick who wins, he can also choose the losers. Of course, there may have been different traditions about Odin and Freyja, just like the followers of Amun and those of ...


10

In contrast to the stanza in Gylfaginning's chapter 24, in the Hákonarmál Odin sends his valkyries to announce to king Haakon the Good that he has been granted a seat in the hall of the slain: They spoke over his grave, as heathen people are used to do, and wished him in Valhal. Eyvind Skaldaspiller composed a poem on the death of King Hakon, and on how ...


7

Ragnarok myths, especially the Voluspa, were greatly influenced by Christianity. Typically pagan myths influenced Christianity more, but in this case, the influence of Christianity on Ragnarok myths is not just likely, but certain. The book of Revelation from the New Testament is highly detailed, yet it is a prophecy. The prose of such prophecies is that ...


7

The main issue here to answer this question is that we don't know anything about Óðr. He is only mentioned in : the paragraph you quoted from the Gylfaginning; stanza 25 of the Völuspá: Þá gengu regin öll á rökstóla, ginnheilug goð, ok um þat gættusk: hverr hefði lopt allt lævi blandit eða ætt jötuns Óðs mey gefna. which translates to: ...


7

The only real role of Víđarr in the norse mythology seems to be to avenge his father Odin during Ragnarokr by slaughtering Fenrir. In a footnote to his article Le dieu scandinave Víđarr , Georges Dumézil hints that it may be one explanation for his silence: On a proposé d'autres explications pour le silence de Vidarr; ce serait, par exemple, ...


7

The thirteenth-century writings of Snorri Sturluson are remarkable, but they must be placed in context. He wrote long after conversion, and his work was likely affected by the fogging of the lens caused by time and the shift in beliefs caused by the arrival of Christianity. In addition, Snorri's Iceland was far removed from Scandinavia, so anything that one ...


6

Here is the way the whole story after the plowing of Denmark by Gefjun is summarized in another work by Snorri Struluson, the Ynglinga Saga: Now when Odin heard that things were in a prosperous condition in the land to the east beside Gylve; he went thither, and Gylve made a peace with him, for Gylve thought he had no strength to oppose the people of ...


5

Norse mythology often alludes to nine worlds. Eight of these are known with relative certainty: Asgard, realm of the Aesir Vanaheim, realm of the Vanir Alfheim, realm of the (light) elves Midgard, realm of men Jotunheim, realm of the Jotun (giants) Muspell, realm of fire Niflheim, realm of ice Hel, real of the dishonorable dead The missing ninth world ...


5

The same name being applied to each of them likely reflects the similarity of the roles, as a wanderer. Gylfi takes up a role markedly similar to one you might expect from Odin in this aspect, as a wanderer: Gylfi takes the Odin-role in this contest of wisdom, as the traveler under an assumed name, and indeed this assumed name, Gangleri, is one of Odin's....


4

The supposedly nameless sword juggler is a well known figure in the Norse mythology. He's the son of Odin and Frigg, and is the messenger of the gods. His name is Hermod or, Hermóðr the Brave. The version of the story referenced in the question does not reveal the name of the juggler. However, in The Norse Myths by Heilan Yvette Grimes (ISBN: ...


4

Quoting directly from the Gylfaginning (verse 15), with emphasis, Then said Ganglere: Where is the chief or most holy place of the gods? Har answered: That is by the ash Ygdrasil. There the gods meet in council every day. Said Ganglere: What is said about this place? Answered Jafnhar: This ash is the best and greatest of all trees; its branches spread ...


3

This is probably not a very satisfying answer but it seems that his name isn't mentioned in any account of this story, and knowing that he comes from Jotunheim doesn't really help narrowing down the possibilities. One thing to consider is the way the plowing of Denmark is related in the Ynglinga saga (which is the first chapter of the Heimskringla, which ...


2

It seems that Odin chooses who dies while Freya gets first pick. But this has doesn't mean Odin chooses who comes to his hall. If he were to choose the best, then Freya would take half. If he were to do the opposite, he would not gain anything from it. Maybe it was a sign of goodwill between the Aesir and Vanir (Freya is a Vanir)


1

In Tolkien's Silmarillion the Dark Elves (Moriquendi) are definitely elves and distinct from dwarves. Tom Shippey, a professor of Old and Middle English, believed that Tolkien took the concept from the ljósálfar (light-elves) and dökkálfar (dark-elves) of the Prose Edda. Sturluson seems to contradict himself by stating that the dark elves are dwarves, ...


1

The issue with figuring the answer to this is to know that Norse mythology now has been convoluted by old Christianity. This was done to make people who follow the Norse mythology to be easier to lead into Christianity. As Helheim was made after Christianity helped change it. The original realms were as so Asgard Vanaheim Alfheim Midgard Jotunheim Nimvilier ...


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