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This is something very usual to happen in old stories, specially in the mythological ones. They have a dream-like logic and a dream-like inconsistency. The latter is clear, for example, when talking about sizes, Fenrir may be a normal sized wolf when tied down by the æsir, but he is sometimes described as having a jaw that can touch the sky when open and so ...


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As explained, the runes say "not all who wander are lost" (in English and in a very nonrunic mode) a line referring to Aragorn. The two ravens are most likely Huginn and Muninn, Oðin's birds that would fly all over seeing what's to be seen. The rune staff below seems to have originated in a 19th century collection of runic spells. Description. The ...


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In the Poetic Edda, it's clear that Loki is different from the Aesir. He descended from Ymir, whereas the Aesir did not. It's possible that his rules are different from the Aesir's, too. For example, he shape shifted into the female gender on several different occasions; whereas, the Aesir were never known to do that. It seemed likely that he went for ...


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These rivers are mentioned in verse 29 of the Grimnismol: Kormt and Ormt and the Kerlaugs twain Shall Thor each day wade through, When dooms to give he forth shall go To the ash-tree Yggdrasil; For heaven's bridge burns all in flame, And the sacred waters seethe. There are 2 prevailing interpretations of this verse: the verse ...


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