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These lists of the nine worlds are modern speculations/generalisations. I would like to see elder literature or source material support this. Don't forget that the bardic and scholarly tradition peculiar, somehow, to the Northern Islands (Orkneyar etc.) and Iceland, left Norway, and Scandinavia because of resistance against the novel feudalism of King ...


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It is a bit challenging to delimit the quest of this question. For instant, there are lists (thulas) of serpents, which may, and may not be considered dragons. The mythological Jörmundgandr ("the world serpent"), for instant, I find Jörmungandr reflected in the most classic dragon of all Norse, Fafnir, because of the name, quite simply signifying 'Fathom'. ...


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The word appears in various sagas, including Yngling's saga and Egill Skallagrímsson's saga and are often not very nice people. There is, indeed, a debate on whether the word originally comes from a root ber- (hence old norse bjǫrn, cognate with english "bear") or berr (cognate with english "bare"), however, either way, the expected runic form (younger ...


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According to Snorri's texts, yes, but it is the only source of such a story. He says: "Loki á orrostu við Heimdall, ok verðr hvárr annars bani." My own translation: "Loki goes to battle against Heimdallr, and both cause death to each other." We don't know how much we can trust on Snorri's texts, since they were written long after the old norse ...


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