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11 votes
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Who was the Greek god Iudaios?

From page 284 of volume 2, part 1 of the mentioned book: Unfortunately, there's not a lot in there. A quick and rough translation (sorry in case I missed any unique English name used for these): ...
Mario's user avatar
  • 308
10 votes

Who was the Greek god Iudaios?

I suspect there is some confusion here regarding the word itself, and that the sites mentioning "Iudaios" as a Greek god may be unreliable. The linked site is certainly unreliable, and the article ...
DukeZhou's user avatar
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8 votes

What is the connection between Asherah and the custom of Christmas Trees?

There is no historical connection. The cultures that worshiped Asherah were mostly destroyed when the Babylonians invaded the kingdom of Judah and took a large portion of the populace as captives. ...
Justin Eiler's user avatar
8 votes
Accepted

Why did Christians, who take a huge part of their Bible from Jews, not have to follow the same rules as Jews?

The relevance and applicability of the Mosaic Code to Christians, especially gentile Christians, is a vexed theological question that Paul addresses and tries to finesse in more than one of his ...
Brian Donovan's user avatar
7 votes

Who was the Greek god Iudaios?

BRIEF There is no Greek god called by this name. The character in question, according to the Greco-Roman mythographers, is someone—most likely a regular garden-variety man—who is supposed to have ...
Adinkra's user avatar
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6 votes
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Significance of Enoch's age in the Hebrew Bible and identification with seventh antediluvian king/sage from Mesopotamian mythology

A few possible answers: From a more secular view: Heinrich Zimmern in The Babylonian and the Hebrew Genesis (Originally in German "Biblische und babylonische Urgeschichte"), pg 44-45, wrote: ...
Harel13's user avatar
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5 votes

If angels cannot reproduce, then why did God castrate the angel Samael?

The answer is given in the very quotation you cite: in that tale, angels can indeed procreate, and have "demonic offspring." Tales frequently are inconsistent.
Mary's user avatar
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5 votes
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Is there a myth about the World Egg in Talmud?

Going by the note @tohuwawohu found in Eisler's book, there isn't anything remotely as explicit as Eisler said not in Tractate Chagigah 12 nor in Midrash Beresheet Rabbah 10. Eisler said, according to ...
Harel13's user avatar
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5 votes

How did the angels Michael and Gabriel come to be associated with water and fire?

After a brief search on Google, I found the following in the Jewish Encyclopedia, which I quote: Michael is snow, Gabriel is fire (Lüken, l.c. p. 55; comp. Yoma 21b, bottom). Nevertheless, it is ...
solsdottir's user avatar
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4 votes

How did the angels Michael and Gabriel come to be associated with water and fire?

In most schools of "Western Ritual Magic," some of which seems to have Judaic roots, Michael is invoked in the South as Archangel of Fire & Gabriel in the West as Archangel of Water. I don't know ...
barry's user avatar
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3 votes
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How did the angels Michael and Gabriel come to be associated with water and fire?

Gabriel: There are a number of midrashim that tie Gabriel to fire: Devarim Rabbah 5:12: "...He imposes peace in His heights." Said Reish Lakish, Michael is entirely snow and Gabriel is ...
Harel13's user avatar
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3 votes
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Tubal-cain (תּוּבַל קַיִן) and Vulcan

Googling Vulcan and Tubalcain has revealed a wealth of information: The McClintock and Strong Biblical Cyclopedia writes: "The derivation of the name is extremely obscure. Hasse (Entdeckungen, 2,...
Harel13's user avatar
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2 votes

If angels cannot reproduce, then why did God castrate the angel Samael?

As Mary's answer has already said, angels often are portrayed as capable of procreating. The origin of the Nephilim in Genesis is an example of this explicitly stated in the bible, if briefly. I ...
Jeremiah's user avatar
  • 121
1 vote

Was early Judaism polytheistic?

Early Judaism was polytheistic, Solomon most definitely worshipped at least seven deities, as was the tradition in Levant and Mesopothamia (hypostasis of Planets). The monotheistic concept appeared in ...
Wolves' Shepherd.'s user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Was early Judaism polytheistic?

This is indeed a widely held view in academia, and has been for a while, although the angels are not always considered "gods." Other gods have been mentioned though. Asherah, for example, ...
cmw's user avatar
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