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(Just for what little it worths, "most sources on the internet" seem to be carbon copies of each other, be it Wikipedia, Encyclopedia Iranica which seem to refer back to articles in JSTOR. Anyway.) A search through An Avesta Grammar in Comparison with Sanskrit reveals that you're on the right path with early Iranian roots: WIND --- Av. văyu-, Skt. ...


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Statues were colored in Ancient Greece, and it's indicated by pigment traces that, for example, the statue of a deity did not get a new hair color every (insert interval here) like a modern-day celebrity. The LiebigHaus collection currently has a great exhibition reconstructing the color of Olympian statues. This is probably as close as you can possibly get ...


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The question is: "Which specific ancient sources did NOT consider Kronus and Chronos to be the same being?" As a Greek who has been taught Ancient Greek, i can assure you that modern Greek are not the same thing, ancient ones are like a foreign language to most of us. But let's go to the point. Some things remain the same or similar. Kronus = ...


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When the archeologists managed to decipher Linear B, they found many shopping lists that included purchases of sacrifices for this god or that. The only Olympian missing was Apollo. Thus, all the rest go back to the earliest records. Apollo does appear in The Iliad, so that is about the only god whose appearance in history can be dated. (I note that some ...


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It really depends on how you define "appeared in history for the first time". Let me illustrate by an example: Zeus may be known to most as a Greek god, but this deity (and his name) is actually based on a much older proto-Indo-European deity called Dyeus ph2tēr (lit. "father daylight-sky-god") - hence the Roman Jupiter. Dyeus is also the ...


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Plutarch and Cicero were writing several hundred years after the earliest Greek poetry describing Cronus and Chronus. You can't really use what authors so late thought to argue what earlier authors thought. The question is also a little backwards. If Chronus and Cronus were later inflations, how could anyone before possibly have said that they were different?...


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Krampus is based in the Alps of Austria and Bavaria. I am not to sure if he is norse, maybe more of a local myth. Sure he looks a bit like Faun or a devil but in the alps there are other "Schiachperchtn" (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perchta) that show up in Winter to celebrate the passing of midwinter and fade away after 6th Janurary nowadays


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The Giants and Gods are different! In the Greek creation myths, Gaea and Ouranos had multiple 'groups' of children. The first were creatures that had "shattering, overwhelming strength" and "a hundred hands and fifty heads". Then came the Cyclopes, and after them the Titans. Cronus overthrew his father Ouranos. When he overthrew his ...


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