13

This tale appears to come from Toltec mythology, related to us by the Aztec and preserved in later Mexican source. The Ixtlilxochitl your source cites is almost certainly Fernando de Alva Cortés Ixtlilxochitl, an early modern native historian from New Spain. He wrote that: In the year 8 Tochtli, which was 1,347 years after the second calamity and 4,779 ...


13

There isn't much to go on with this one. The best first source I can find is a book called Myths and Legends of the New York State Iroquois, by Harriet Maxwell Converse, 1908. It's about as good of a first source as there's going to be, since Iroquois stories were transmitted from generation to generation orally, and other people like Ms. Converse had to be ...


12

The idea of the Coyote Trickster god is pretty widespread. My copy of The Book of the Navajo contains "The Tale of Coyote, the Troublemaker". The Coyote is also known to the Apache in the "Badger carries Darkness: Coyote and Bobcat scratch each other" A Cheyenne tale called "How he got tongue" And a Blackfoot Coyote tale called "Little Friend Coyote" He'...


11

The entire story can be found here. This story deals with a Creator god (Earthmaker) who was alone in space, with nothing around him. His first "creation" was his tears, which forms oceans, lakes, and streams. His following creations (light, earth, plants, etc.) were all thought into existence. He then made man out of clay, and breathed life into man. ...


11

They Sang for Horses first published in 1966 is devoted pretty much exclusively to this topic. The Navajos first obtained horses in the early 1600s, and the Navajo nations didn't become part of the United States till 1848 so that gave them around 250 years in which to establish their own mythology around horses. Navajo was an unwritten language prior to the ...


11

The underwater panther is indeed a very widespread figure. Ancient Objects and Sacred Realms: Interpretations of Mississippian Iconography has a section titled "The Forms of the Underwater Powers", which gives brief descriptions of records of similar traditions from peoples spanning the Plains, Mississippi river, Great Lakes, and Southeastern United States. ...


8

One important thing to note here is that many (most?) American Indians did not first get horses directly from the European traders or settlers. According to Jared Diamond what happened was that the Spanish brought horses with them, some escaped and went feral, and the plains tribes (many of whom had never encountered a European) tamed those feral horses. So ...


7

Well, not many do anymore. I found this on a question on the skeptics stack exchange [Carolyn J. Marr] illustrates a change in Native Americans' attitudes towards photography from the late 19th to the early 20th century. At first, many Native Americans were wary of having their photographs taken and often refused. They believed that the process could ...


6

According to this blog post by Adam James Jones the "Skinwalker curse is desired and acquired": They are stories of shape-shifting creatures acrosss Navajo Nation, the 24k-plus reservation land encompassing most of northeastern Arizona and the adjacent corner sections of New Mexico and Utah. A taboo subject amongst natives, Skinwalkers are seldom ...


6

I come from a long line of leaders and Chiefs of the Sauks. My clan is in English is called Beaver because there was not word for underwater panther in English. My true clan name is Underwater Panther. When my Grandfather Elmer Manatowa Sr died, they found two skins of the underwater panther which looked like a panther, with long nose, web feet, and tail ...


6

Given that the people of the Pacific Northwest are not a homogeneous group, there is, naturally, variation in their versions of the fire-acquisition story. It seems, though, that they all agree that an animal stole fire from a mountain and brought it to humankind, much like in the myth of Prometheus (though there is surely no direct connection with Greek ...


4

Sásq'ets is a mythical creature. . . Sort of. Etymology and related names Sasquatch: Legend Meets Science, by Jeff Meldrum, says (emphasis mine): The various tribes across North America have attached their own names to the entity. These names number more than sixty, but most generally make reference to a "Wildman of the woods." In the 1920s, Canadian ...


4

Hard to answer question. The main problem here is the natives was not knowing writing at all. So we find pretty old account by explorers back in the 1700 BUT those are by people having some difficulties talking with the natives and having way more goal than collecting myths... Now most of what we have is so relatively recent. One of the least recent piece we ...


3

To my knowledge, they do not die, but can be rendered inert through a two step process. Shattering their heart with a silver blade, and cutting up the body. Burn the pieces without mixing them, and scatter the remains in places far from each other, such as one part in a well and another part in a cave miles away and another part buried in a hole miles away ...


2

I'm afraid there probably isn't one. Growing up with some Native family myself, I gathered "Happy Hunting Ground" was not an actual native term they used, but rather one of those phrases white men use to make fun of them, like "firewater" and "thunder-stick". That's the context I always heard it in. However, there appears to be a legit Wikipedia page for ...


1

Bear hibernation was likely perceived as a form of deep sleep, and recent studies have confirmed this: Historically there was a question of whether or not bears truly hibernate since they experience only a modest decline in body temperature (3–5 °C) compared with the much larger decreases (often 32 °C or more) seen in other hibernators. Many ...


1

specifically Osage keywords for searches: "The Great Snake," "The Great Serpent" "She'-ki," We'tsa ton-ga," "Old Woman" or "Old Woman who never dies"(The great serpent is her husband.) "Piasa," although a word made up by Europeans, would yield some information. Look for things by Francis LaFleshe, especially the Osage dictionary, Carol Diaz-granados, James ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible