17

I have asked this question on the English Wikipedia Reference Desk a few months ago. This answer contains a copy of the answers volunteered there. Livius Andronicus (c. 284 – c. 204 BC) was possibly the first who translated the Odyssey into Latin, but his translation has not survived. There have been many Latin translations of Homer over the centuries, but ...


7

There's certainly other ways the original text could be translated, it doesn't really force you into an archer analogy: αὐτίκ᾽ ἄρ᾽ ἥ γ᾽ ἱμάντα θοῶς ἀπέλυσε κορώνης, ἐν δὲ κληῗδ᾽ ἧκε, θυρέων δ᾽ ἀνέκοπτεν ὀχῆας ἄντα τιτυσκομένη The key words: αὐτίκα: "forthwith, at once, in a moment," ἱμάς: "leathern strap" θοόω: "quick", or "(make) sharp" ἀπολύω: "...


7

First, it should be noted that this question is not particular to mythology: the same problem appears in history and literature as well. Second, we should note that using a translation is always a secondary or tertiary choice for the serious scholar. When doing a study of a text, it is always preferable to be able read it in the original language. If that ...


5

You can find this one, certainly not the best, but a good one, and as free as you like.


5

Interesting question. I should say that for Latin and Greek I am not so sure the translations are all that different (I invite anyone to demonstrate the contrary). Now it would if either Solsdottir or Andejons could do what I will do here with Norse myth. Here, I will give something I know well: a Sumerian text passage with the ETCSL translation a ...


5

You have this dictionary: https://library.alaska.gov/hist/hist_docs/docs/anlm/200078.pdf I would like to notice the problem when reading such old books made by pioneers is that the lack of any norms makes it difficult to follow them. The way they were writing names, and the fact that due to the time they were writing a creature could be named X by tribe 1, ...


4

The scholiast to Apollonius of Rhodes gives the story with Orion, but nothing about Artemis. The scholiast to Pindar Nemean 2.17-18 also gives the story with Orion (along with a lot of non-mythological content). I don't see in either one of them a reference to a connection with Artemis. However, there are sources for this in the scholia, which you have ...


4

As far as I know (having been searching for a long time), there's no published translation (English or otherwise) of any complete set of Greek scholia. But there are possible workarounds. Commentaries often quote or paraphrase scholia, so you might start by looking at a commentary on the quoted passage. For example, Perseus has a digitized copy of a ...


4

This has always been a painful area in philology for several reasons: In many cases, verses in the original text can have several inferred meanings. For some languages and cultures, this is actually part of the tradition. For example, in Literary Chinese, each verse of the Tao Te Ching can be translated in several ways, each with a significantly different ...


4

I think you'll find that it's Apollo Clarius (Klarios) that you're looking for. While both names occur on the site Theoi.com, only Clarius has an entry, which makes me think that Clerius may be a misspelling. That it turns up nothing on JSTOR and very few hits on Google seems to confirm this.) Apollo Clarius was an Ionic deity, and appeared on coins from ...


4

While Gibet is completely right, there are far more elementary issues hidden. Basically whenever someone has to read or listen and interpret a story there might be differences, which in the end can change the whole content, especially while translating. Let's take a short, modern English sentence: He was done. What does it mean? Especially with a lack ...


3

Regarding the variance of Ancient Greek texts, I strongly urge anyone with an interest to compare the Pope, Lattimore, Fitzgerald and Fagles Iliads. The variance of translation will be immediately apparent. Although the stories are all the same, details may differ due to the degree of license taken by various authors in translating. Thus a question like "...


3

This may seem odd, but I'm answering my own question. The transliteration answer for (گرگینه) is gorgine. I found the answer here: https://www.wordsense.eu/werewolf/ and the audio pronunciation here: https://www.languagedrops.com/word/en/english/persian/translate/werewolf/


2

That is actually the second half of Line 274 of Iliad 1: ἐπεὶ πείθεσθαι ἄμεινον (epeì peíthesthai ámeinon), an expression very commonly rendered into English as "to obey is better", such as in Augustus Taber Murray's 1924 translation (Harvard University Press). Samuel Butler's 1898 rendition (Cambridge University Press) has "for this is the more ...


2

I'm afraid there probably isn't one. Growing up with some Native family myself, I gathered "Happy Hunting Ground" was not an actual native term they used, but rather one of those phrases white men use to make fun of them, like "firewater" and "thunder-stick". That's the context I always heard it in. However, there appears to be a legit Wikipedia page for ...


2

    Homeric Hymn to Demeter 1-3 (A.N. Athanassakis translation) No Ancient Greek source that I have come across explicitly mentions Hades asking for Persephone. In one way or another they all say simply that Zeus gave Persephone to his brother, and that the giveaway method was the fairly common worldwide practice of bride-kidnapping, which in some ...


2

Towards an answer: You might look here. Beke's Stories From the Edda may (or may not!) be (all or part of) Snorra Edda. Perhaps better, István Bernáth's Skandináv Mitológia appears to contain an Hungarian translation of Snorra Edda along with scholarly essays and other translations.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible