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15

The following quotes are taken from Spirits, Fairies, Leprechauns and Goblins - An Encyclopedia, by Carol Rose (highly recommended). In the entry for Brownies: Families were proud of their Brownies as they brought good fortune; to lose one was disastrous. [...] In general, the Brownie was the most industrious of the household spirits, ploughing, ...


14

Keep in mind that we're reaching deep behind the shrouds of history. Little is known for certain of religious practices this far back; thus, a great deal of speculation and reconstruction is necessary on this topic. One possibility is Annis. Also known as Anu or Danu, or Dana. She was a Celtic deity that some writers contend was a malevolent mother goddess ...


12

Hulking out is a fairly appropriate comparison to the riastrad, or warp spasm, as Kinsella put it, but far more monstrous than just green-tinged and well-muscled. Massively muscled, lower legs twisted around backward, one eye sucked into his head, the other eye having fallen outward, cheeks peeled away from his mouth to reveal his jaw, his own internal ...


11

Celtic refers to any of the peoples who spoke Celtic languages, and this includes France, parts of Germany and Austria, and northern Italy. The peoples of Ireland and Britain are called Insular Celts, because they live on islands off the European coastline. And no, they did not believe in the same gods, although you can often find similar types of gods and ...


10

Yes, both in characteristics and history. Starting from here, Another writer, Wirt Sikes wrote in the British Goblins (1880), comparing the Welsh fairies with that of Norse/Teutonic fairies. Sikes says that there are four types in the Norse tradition: elves, dwarves and troll, nisses and necks, mermen, and mermaids. While in ...


10

The actual lyric is: I call you all To Woden's Hall, Your temples round With ivy bound In goblets crown'd, And plenteous bowls of burnish'd gold, Where ye shall laugh And dance and quaff The juice that makes the Britons bold To figure this out, what is Woden's Hall? The simplest source for this is Wikipedia - though it's corroborated in ...


9

I'm not aware of a story that could possibly be a basis for the white walkers, but it could be argued that a zombie story exists in the second branch of the Mabinogi, the tale of Branwen ferch Llŷr. A key element of the tale is the Pair Dadeni, a magical cauldron able to revive the dead: "And I will enhance the atonement," said Bendigeid Vran, "for I will ...


9

I'm not entirely certain this means "born on the moon". Most texts that I can find refer to Elfland as being subterranean: The fairyland of the ballad tradition similarly existed in a kind of wilderness, albiet one suffused in preternatural light. As already indicated, Thomas Rhymer's Elfland was situated in some sort of subterranean locale wherein 'he ...


8

These three characters are recurring in various mummer or guiser plays. These are old traditional folk dance/theatrical rituals which are known to have been performed at least as early as in the Middle Ages, though it's not known exactly how the plays/dances looked back them. But the versions that are still performed are documented at least in the mid-1800's....


6

Abhartach (Ireland) Irish folklore speaks of Abhartach, a dwarf who rose from the dead multiple times after being slain. In The Origin and History of Irish Names of Places (c. 1871), Patrick Weston Joyce relates the myth: This dwarf was a magician, and a dreadful tyrant, and after having perpetrated great cruelties on the people he was at last vanquished ...


6

I have a theory that could possibly explain this. In Ezekiel 28:12-14, the king of Tyre (who is commonly believed to be Satan) is described as a cherub. In Ezekiel 1, the prophet Ezekiel saw 4 living creatures that had 4 faces, one of which is a bull. Later in chapter 10, he sees them again but says their are cherubim, and remembers that he had seen them ...


5

Your question is difficult to answer definitely because of several factors: what we know about the concepts and beliefs of iron age Europe is a patchwork of evidence, archaeology, contemporary descriptions by other cultures and pure, albeit educated, guesswork. Academia abounds with arguments for and against the reality of the "Celt" as a loose term for a ...


5

It looks like a kind of square/cross or octagon. Square / cross is symbol of Tetragrammaton, the four-letter biblical name of the God. Octagon is the ultimate balance between physical and invisible forces. Harmony and perfect equality between matter and spirit. a oneness of the two. The male and female as one. The fully aware humanity. Exhalation of the ...


5

I am no expert but I think that while some are geographical, most are based on pre-existing myths. Most Celtic faeries are linked to Greco-roman nature spirits and gods. For instance La Dame du Lac is probably a type of Naiad or Limnade. The Lares gave all domestic fae and other faeries. Local legends, like La Bête de Gèvaudan, one of a kind monster in ...


5

This compares the Korrigans to three earlier mythological figures: Ceridwen The Lady of the Fountain The Lady of the Lake Ceridwen is first (and perhaps only) mentioned in the story of Taliesin, in the Mabinogion. She is not depicted favorably - as a magical figure who, to put it one way, reacts poorly to failure. She really only appears in the first part ...


5

Well, the movie's culture is purportedly based on Celtic paganism. Mostly gods were worshiped locally in this tradition. Epona is a rare exception: Epona is a unusual case of a pagan Celtic god that received widespread worship, to the point she was even incorporated to some degree into the Roman pantheon. She is a goddess of fertility and protector of ...


4

Tolkien apparently drew much of his inspiration for his elves from the Welsh supernatural owners of nature, the Tylwyth Teg: these are remarkable for the degree that the Welsh assigned their brand of elves a royal attribute. And this apparently suited Tolkien. There is a remarkable, broad swath of shared belief systems in Northern Europe that extends from ...


4

Epona was a protector goddess and also the goddess of fertility and was welcomed into many homesteads at the time because she just about covered everything. The Romans believed that they should never anger the gods and so when a new god surfaced that had a high likability like Epona, the Romans took them in. However, Epona wasn't highly worshiped by Roman ...


4

The two most common candidates are Cernunnos and Sucellos. Anne Ross in her book Pagan Celtic Religion, and Phyllis Fray Bober in her paper on Cernunnos both suggest that the god, who has connections to wealth and possibly the underworld, could be the god JC meant. Sucellos, especially as Sucellos Silvanus (yet another Roman god) is another candidate, ...


4

1) Who is Scáthach? Scáthach is the warrior woman who varyingly lives in the 'east of the world' who Cú Chulainn is sent to train with: Then Domnall said that Cuchulind would not have profession of instruction until he came to Scathach, who was in the east of Alba. So the three of them went across Alba, viz. Cuchulind, and Conchobar, the king of ...


4

How are Norse and Celtic mythology related? In a few different ways, I suppose. Because they are the mythologies of similar human societies. An example: the “Green Man” isn’t exclusively Celtic, faces made from or surrounded by leaves, fruits, vines or branches, or men with green skin, are found in ancient cultures throughout the world. Often they are ...


3

You can find a lot of sources on Internet Sacred Text Archive ... You have to scroll down to approximately 7/8 and you can find all the fairy texts you need. Or ctrl-f fairies.


3

A number of reasons: mermaids are part of nature, not culture, Classical depictions of marine deities and other spirits show them naked, and because mermaids are supposed to be sexy.


3

There is this reference in Wikipedia: The Tuatha Dé Danann were descended from Nemed, leader of a previous wave of inhabitants of Ireland. The somewhat disjoint genealogies in Lebor Gabála Érenn (also here) can be pieced together to show Nemed -> Iarbonel -> Bethach -> Ibath -> Baath The Nemedians were washed off of Ireland by a tidal wave raised by ...


3

The above answers concentrate on "species" of fairies, but it is also worth noting that different regions tend to have different ways of understanding Faery & fairy folk in general. For instance, in Brittany they are strongly associated with the Dead; in Ireland, with races of previous inhabitants. In Ireland they are likely to wear green; in Wales the ...


2

Katherine Mary Brigg's The Vanishing People: Fairy Lore and Legends, is a good source, as well as Evan-Wentz's The Fairy Faith in Celtic Countries and Robert Kirk's The Secret Commonwealth. They're all out of copyright, so at least some of them are in the Sacred Texts. I'd also recommend Diane Purkiss' At the Bottom of the Garden as a more modern look at ...


2

The Encyclopedia Mythica at http://www.pantheon.org/ has geographical sections. The Celtic section is probably a good place to start. It's the reverse of your original question, in that it lists many fairies and you have to click to see where each one might be associated with, but that might give you some general ideas and you can spread out your research ...


2

I recall that Scathach taught martial arts to Cú Chulainn on the Isle of Skye. Wikipedia confirms this: Scáthach (Scottish Gaelic: Sgàthach an Eilean Sgitheanach), or Sgathaich, is a figure in the Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology. She is a legendary Scottish warrior woman and martial arts teacher who trains the legendary Ulster hero Cú Chulainn in the ...


2

There's maybe one source from all of the surviving literature that may express a pre-Christian British myth with an 'evil' deity, from Plutarch's De Defectu Oraculorum, Vol V: 18 1 Demetrius said that among the islands lying near Britain were many isolated, having few or no inhabitants, some of which bore the names of divinities or heroes. He himself, by ...


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