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17

Although slaves aren't specifically mentioned, Odin's burial laws tell us that "every one will come to Valhalla with the riches he had with him upon the pile": Odin established the same law in his land that had been in force in Asaland. Thus he established by law that all dead men should be burned, and their belongings laid with them upon the pile, ...


8

Blood and poetry. Before I go any deeper, I want to clear up a misconception: Thor is not really a god of thunder. Yes, he does generate it, but his main function is as guardian against the forces of chaos (which goes directly against how gods of thunder storms are portrayed in some RPGs). The main sources for the worship of the Norse gods are the ...


8

These three characters are recurring in various mummer or guiser plays. These are old traditional folk dance/theatrical rituals which are known to have been performed at least as early as in the Middle Ages, though it's not known exactly how the plays/dances looked back them. But the versions that are still performed are documented at least in the mid-1800's....


7

Cremation with one's possessions is given as Odin's law in the Ynglinga Saga. The reasoning given is that cremation with one's possessions allow them to bring whatever was burned with them into Valhalla: Odin established the same law in his land that had been in force in Asaland. Thus he established by law that all dead men should be burned, and ...


6

This falls under the idea that it is an honor to be a sacrifice for the gods. On film that may be worth looking at is Pasolini's 1969 film Medea. The film opens with Medea's royal family sacrificing her brother so the crops will grow. As I recall, the brother is smiling. A good contrast is the 1973 film The Wickerman, which is partly an adaptation of ...


5

Well, the movie's culture is purportedly based on Celtic paganism. Mostly gods were worshiped locally in this tradition. Epona is a rare exception: Epona is a unusual case of a pagan Celtic god that received widespread worship, to the point she was even incorporated to some degree into the Roman pantheon. She is a goddess of fertility and protector of ...


4

The Greeks believed that at the moment of death the psyche, or spirit of the dead, left the body as a little breath or puff of wind. The deceased was then prepared for burial according to the time-honored rituals. Ancient literary sources emphasize the necessity of a proper burial and refer to the omission of burial rites as an insult to human dignity (Iliad,...


4

On the Wikipedia page for Halloween Costumes it says: An early reference to wearing costumes at Halloween comes from Scotland in 1585. Looking at the external links on the page I found something that sort of explains this. As the centuries wore on, people began dressing like these dreadful creatures, performing antics in exchange for food and drink. ...


4

The Maori and their tattoos, the Ta Moko and Kiri Tuhi I'll start by saying that the Ta Moko is well represented of course in the Maori folklore and traditions. For the mythology: The legend of Mataora A less historical explanation of the origin of Maori tattoo can be found in the local legend which suggests that ta moko, the Maori tattoo, came ...


2

Yes, we have two main sources from the Early Roman Occupation era: Strabo, Geographies (64-21 BCE): The Romans put a stop both to these customs and to the ones connected with sacrifice and divination, as they were in conflict with our own ways: for example, they would strike a man who had been consecrated for sacrifice in the back with a sword, and ...


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