16

As with other Greco-Roman myths, the connection is often through children, descendants or other family members. While Europa herself does not seem to have made it to the continental mainland, her brother Kadmos [Cadmus] did, and there, in memory of their hometown, he founded a Greek version of the hundred-gated Egyptian city of Thebes, although his rendition ...


10

The only thing in common is the spelling. LOK in Norse means - The end, or to lock the end. So Loki would be who everyone goes to when they die. UTGARD in Norse, from the wiki means - Outyards or outlands Utgard-Loki is the ruler of the Outyards (Utgard) and his name is also Loki so the name means, Loki ruler of Utgard. Logi in Norse literally means ...


6

Questions about etymology most often lead to literature in various languages. The wikipedia article mentions the (more or less) established view but for lack of translations it appears as unrealiable, coming through a mention of R. Graves. Nineteenth c. philology already proposed that Centaurs are related to the Indic 'Ghandarva' as the phonetic transform ...


6

The word γλαυκῶπις shares its root with γλαύξ, the word for owl. Owls are known for their large and distinctive eyes, which are adapted for low light hunting. Thus, I believe the epithet is a comment on Athena's perceptiveness, telling us that the goddess of wisdom can see even through the dark. You may find more information on Athena's association with ...


6

Unfortunately, your Spanish teacher was wrong. Look under Lewis and Short II.C to see that canere (the ultimate root of enchant > incantare > in + cantare = frequentative of canere) was often used in Latin for spells. Under cantare III you'll see enchant that goes all the way back to the first prose writer in Latin, Cato the Elder (De Re Rustica 160.1). The ...


5

I can find no other story than the Sirens. They agree with the above by all aspects, that is: Their father is either Acheloos (the river god) or Forkys (a sea deity) and their mother is either Chthon (Earth) or a Muse (usually Terpsechore). They are not necessarily beautiful but their singing is delightful. I think I need not repeat the story from Odyssey ...


5

"Ostern" the german word for Easter actually has the same etymology as the english term (citing the German wiki page): "Das neuhochdeutsche Ostern und das englische Easter haben die gleiche sprachliche Wurzel, zu deren Etymologie es verschiedene Lösungsansätze gibt. Das Herkunftswörterbuch des Duden leitet das Wort vom altgermanischen Austrō > ...


5

Many have said that it comes from the goddess Ishtar, the Babylonian goddess of fertility, love, war, and sex. I had actually thought that Easter came directly from worship from her, because etymologically speaking, it doesn't seem too far off. But it seems that the goddess Ēostre (or Ostara), the Germanic goddess, is the one that is directly linked to the ...


4

In recent time the association seems to have been generally dismissed but not so long ago it was credible. Roland B. Dixon, The Color-Symbolism of the Cardinal Points, J. of American Folklore, V. 12, No. 44 (Jan. - Mar., 1899), pp. 10-16 is perhaps an outdated example. The 7-regioned cosmos of the Pueblo peoples (yellow-corn of the North, blue of the ...


4

According to the Wikipedia entry in anonymous's Google search link, the hippogriff was first mentioned by the ancient Roman poet Virgil, in his Ecologues. (Book VIII) He doesn't give the creature a name, just uses the example of gryphons mating with horses to comment on a human relationship that seems equally unlikely. The Roman emperor Augustus built a ...


4

There is an alternate explanation based on Roman conscripts in Roman Britain from Eastern Europe that the Romans credited with introducing the Stirrup to the Roman Cavalry. The defeated province in Eastern Europe was required to provide a certain number of young conscripts to the Roman army each year that had been trained in the use of Cavalry using their ...


3

Zeus kidnapped Europa and took her from Greece, to an island across the sea in lust. The people of her kingdom(she was a princess) freaked out and tried to find her but they never came across the particular island. Eventually they gave up, and called the general area where she had been Europa, which over time, became Europe.


3

Logi means, as pointed out above, fire, so that is explained. Loki and Uthgarda Loki are, however, more open to debate. There is a theory these days that when Snorri Sturlusson wrote the mythology down he, due to his own Christian beliefs needed a Satan-figure and that role was given to Loki. This explains why he went from being on the side of the Aesir to ...


3

The currently preferred view of Greek etymologists is that γλαύξ "owl" and the colour-adjective γλαυκός (in Homer the colour of the sea, later generally “grey”) are not etymologically connected. If γλαυκῶπις is connected with the former, then it means "with the eyes of an owl", not "grey-eyed". The owl is Athena’s special animal; she is generally represented ...


3

It depends, as Yannis said, on the translation. Wikipedia says: In Homer's epic works, Athena's most common epithet is Glaukopis (γλαυκῶπις), which usually is translated as, "bright-eyed" or "with gleaming eyes". The word is a combination of glaukós (γλαυκός, meaning "gleaming, silvery", and later, "bluish-green" or "gray") and ṓps (ὤψ, "eye, face"...


1

If the word for "grey-eyed" and "owl" share a linguistic history, then the correct translation would be "bright-eyed" since literally it would read, "with the eyes of an owl" which generally fall in the spectrum of yellow or a neighboring color. This would make sense being that the owl is almost always associated with Athene


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