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21

Zeus did that. Hermes was the son of Zeus, but he grew up very quickly and one day he decided to seek out adventure. The first thing he thought of was to steal Apollon's oxes and he actually did that. Apollon didn't know who it was at first, but he soon found out that Hermes stole the oxes and took Hermes to Olympus on trial. Hermes confessed the crime and ...


11

As your quote shows, the story of it's creation makes no such specification. If stealing it qualifies as "using" (I believe, in the the Marvel universe, simply lifting the hammer qualifies), the Þrymskviða from the Poetic Edda tells the story of the giant Þrymr stealing Mjollnir, in order to extort the gods into giving him Freyja as his wife. "I have ...


10

It would appear that you are correct in saying that there is no mention—at least not in the ancient mythographers—of the origin of Hermes' shoes. In the Wikipedia article about the shoes, it is claimed that "They were said to be made by the god Hephaestus of imperishable gold and they flew the god as swift as any bird." There is, however, no source indicated ...


9

Direct quote from the wikipedia article of Mjölnir hammer of Thor, a major Norse god associated with thunder. Mjölnir is depicted in Norse mythology as one of the most fearsome weapons, capable of leveling mountains. In his account of Norse mythology, Snorri Sturluson relates how the hammer was made by the dwarven brothers Sindri and Brokkr, and how its ...


9

Not associated with any "gods" as such; there are a large number of folktales containing items with exponential growth. The Aarne-Thompson classification system groups many of these stories into category, AT 565. One of the best-known of these is Why the Sea is Salt, where an out-of-control salt mill grinds out an endless amount of salt. The goings-on in ...


6

If you look in Faulkes' translation of the Poetic Edda the story can be found on pp. 96-7, in the section of Skaldskaparmal that explains kennings for gold. The story begins when Loki cuts off the hair of Thor's wife Sif and has to appease the angry thunder-god. (A link to another translation. Scroll down to section XXXV.) Loki goes to the sons of Ivalde, ...


6

There is an Asura in Indian mythology called RakthaVija. It is difficult to see if his growth is technically exponential. But as the myth goes, he is able to replicate another version of himself from every drop of blood that touches ground ; quite handy skill in a battle. As the story goes on, the primary godess (Durga, if I remember correctly) who was ...


5

Yes. Perseus vs Medusa Before setting off on his mission to go kill the monster Medusa, Perseus received certain special items to help the project along. One of the items was the Aidos kyne (or Aidos kyneēn), "cap of Hades" or "cap of invisibility" (or "Helm of Darkness," if you will), which he sorely needed in order to escape Medusa's two triplet Gorgon ...


4

The objects mentioned in your question were created by Eitri and Brokkr, and the Sons of Ivaldi. However, there are more objects that exist which were crafted by the dwarves. You can find a list of objects belonging to Norse deities here: Viking Mythology Timeless Myth Most of the objects mentioned in the list were created by the Dwarf craftsmen.


4

It's not magical, but the Svartálfar is also made Sif's hair. From Faulkes' translation1 (via Wikipedia): In chapter 96, a myth explaining Skíðblaðnir's creation is provided. The chapter details that the god Loki once cut off the goddess's Sif's hair in an act of mischief. Sif's husband, Thor, enraged, found Loki, caught hold of him, and threatened to ...


4

The gods have powers of their own. As evidenced in the many hymns epics and poems. Immortality Transformation or shape shifting Enhanced intelligence The ability and powers to move from one place to another in an instant Powers to manipulate animals to obey their commands Powers to manipulate the weather Powers to become invisible Powers to create ...


4

The nature of the aegis depends on what source you're looking at. Euripides suggests that the aegis was the skin of the slain Gorgon, but the Gorgon is commonly held to be a later addition. Diodorus Siculus claims it was the skin of a monster that Athena killed and flayed. The twelfth century Byzantine poet John Tzetzes claims it was the skin of the ...


4

If you mean some sort of book, there doesn't appear to be anything of the kind. However... In the poem Voluspa, the Norns do write, or at least carve on wood (verse 20). From there came three maidens, knowing much three from the lake that stands under the tree Destiny they called one, Becoming the second - they carved on wood tablets - Shall-be ...


3

No magical powers. At least none that are recorded. The Brísingamen is only named a few times: In Þrymskviða in the Poetic Edda, where Thor is disguised as Freya and wears it, and by Snorri, who uses it as a kenning for Freya, "owner of Brísingamen" (Skáldskaparmál, 20) and Loki, "thief of Brísingamen" (Skáldskaparmál, 16). There are a few more texts that ...


3

In The Lives of Dwarfs: Their Journey from Public Curiosity toward Social Liberation, Betty Adelson identifies Sukuna-biko, an ally of Okuninushi in Shinto mythology, as an example of a dwarf god: In a Japanese tale, the Great-Land-Master, an excellent and just ruler, is standing on the shore when a dwarf god named Suku-na-biko, "The Small Renown Man," ...


2

Dain and his brother Nabbi, created the magical boar named Hildisvini Freyja rides this boar. Alfrigg and Berling and Dvalin and Grerr created the Brisingamen (A Golden Necklace) for the goddess Freyja. Andvare created the cursed ring, Andvarenaut, he was robbed by Loki. The cursed ring had the same abilities as Draupnir however, the ring was cursed and ...


2

Apparently yes, their weapons could be used against them, although I have only ever encountered one example of this in the ancient sources,✭ specifically in Apollodorus' Library 1.6.3, wherein Zeus is engaged in a fierce struggle against the humongous, many-armed monster Typhon. Zeus' two means of battling the monster are his thunderbolts, which he uses as ...


2

Nope, they did not get that tasty fruit that would have granted them eternal life: Now the Lord God said, "Behold man has become like one of us, having the ability of knowing good and evil, and now, lest he stretch forth his hand and take also from the Tree of Life and eat and live forever." And He drove the man out, and He stationed from the east of ...


1

Yes, He warned them off the fruit, lest they die and, no, they were expelled from the garden because of their disobedience towards God's will. All of which strikes me as unfair insofar as it's akin to placing a toddler in the kitchen and saying, "here are all these delicious vegetables I want you to eat, but if you ever eat these delicious, scrumptious ...


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