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22

Dwarfs, mostly. Some particular examples: Gungnir: created by the Sons of Ivaldi (Prose Edda, p 145) Loki went to those dwarves who are called Ívaldi's Sons; and they made the hair, and Skídbladnir also, and the spear which became Odin's possession [Gungnir] Mjölnir: created by Eitri and Brokkr (Prose Edda, p 146) Then he [Eitri] took from the forge ...


12

Many weapons were made by dwarfs. Brokk and Eiti (Sindri) made Mjölnir (Thor's hammer) according to the Prose Edda and Odin's spear Gungnir which the dwarfs originally gave to Loki.


11

As your quote shows, the story of it's creation makes no such specification. If stealing it qualifies as "using" (I believe, in the the Marvel universe, simply lifting the hammer qualifies), the Þrymskviða from the Poetic Edda tells the story of the giant Þrymr stealing Mjollnir, in order to extort the gods into giving him Freyja as his wife. "I have ...


9

Norse gods didn't have a "smith" god (like the Greek god Hephaestus or his Roman counterpart Vulcan). In spite of being polytheists they didn't divide every aspect of their lives in the way that other cultures (Greek, Roman) did. In Norse mythology most of the "cool crafts" where done by the Dwarfs (Dwarves). [Dwarfs had] a far greater cleverness in the ...


9

Direct quote from the wikipedia article of Mjölnir hammer of Thor, a major Norse god associated with thunder. Mjölnir is depicted in Norse mythology as one of the most fearsome weapons, capable of leveling mountains. In his account of Norse mythology, Snorri Sturluson relates how the hammer was made by the dwarven brothers Sindri and Brokkr, and how its ...


6

If you look in Faulkes' translation of the Poetic Edda the story can be found on pp. 96-7, in the section of Skaldskaparmal that explains kennings for gold. The story begins when Loki cuts off the hair of Thor's wife Sif and has to appease the angry thunder-god. (A link to another translation. Scroll down to section XXXV.) Loki goes to the sons of Ivalde, ...


5

Short answer: Not really, but closer than many other gods. Long answer: The Norse gods are generally not all-powerful; they can and they will die. They also seem to rely on Thor's hammer Mjölnir to a large degree to keep the status quo and not be overrun by the jotuns. When Thor loses Mjölnir in Þrymskviða, this is seen as a major threat to the gods. (BTW, ...


5

The only particular weapon given more than passing mention that I can find is Isis's harpoon in The Contendings of Horus and Seth (part of the Papyrus Chester Beatty I), which she makes herself from some yarn and copper: Then she fetched a skein of yarn. She fashioned a line, fetched a deben-weight's (worth) of copper, cast it in (the form of) a harpoon, ...


4

It was fairly typical for Indo-European gods to have associated weapons or tools. For example, Thor's hammer and Lugh's spear. Vishnu, having 4 arms, can dual-wield a club and a oddjob-esque death Frisbee. However, Semitic people did their deities a bit differently. They tended to have non-human aspects, in some cases being entirely based on animals. Egypt ...


3

Zeus didn't have a single individual weapon, like Þor's Mjǫllnir, which would come back to him after each strike—instead, most depictions have him hurling a new lightning bolt each time, which is destroyed on impact. So in that sense, there was never a single bolt to name. However, in Ancient Greek, there are several words for what happens during a storm: ...


2

Apparently yes, their weapons could be used against them, although I have only ever encountered one example of this in the ancient sources,✭ specifically in Apollodorus' Library 1.6.3, wherein Zeus is engaged in a fierce struggle against the humongous, many-armed monster Typhon. Zeus' two means of battling the monster are his thunderbolts, which he uses as ...


2

Although it's Manannan's sword, Lugh wears it in the story of The Fate of the Children of Tuireann. He has Manannan's horse, lorica (breastplate) and his sword, probably because Manannan fostered him. Two translations, one by Eugene O'Curry and another by P.W. Joyce both mention this, so presumably there's the source. (I found these sources here, by the ...


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