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31

Egyptian gods were often depicted in therianthrophic – part human, part animal form, to depict the personality of that particular god/ess in a symbolic way. For example, Sekhmet, goddess of ferocious war, was sometimes shown with the head a lioness, as lions are ferocious creatures. Similarly Anubis was shown with a jackal head because the jackal was ...


24

I've heard this claim before and see no evidence for it in any Egyptian texts or iconography. Acharya S is unscholarly, makes many silly mistakes, and thus is unreliable; and Maher's people obviously got his bullet points from the Acharya piece to which you linked in your question. Acharya throws up numerous points hoping that some of them will stick, but ...


21

Their association with Bastet coupled with their general usefulness in day to day life is the reason they were treated as they were Bastet was the goddess of more than just cats, she was also the goddess of fire and pregnant women (an odd combination). Bastet was originally called Mafdet and was the lion headed goddess of judgement, justice, and execution....


18

It's mentioned in the Coffin Texts that only the dead can know the true forms of the gods. (Erik Hornung- Conceptions of God in Ancient Egypt.) "None of these images shows the true form of a god, and none can encompass the full richness of his nature–hence the variable iconography of Egyptian gods, which is seldom reduced to a fixed, canonical form. Every ...


17

The five parts of the Egyptian soul were the Ren, the Ba, the Ka, the Sheut, and the Ib. The Ren was the name given to a person at birth. Egyptians believed it was part of a person's soul and that it would live for as long as that name was spoken or the person remembered. The Sheut was the person's shadow or silhouette. Egyptians believed that the shadow, ...


16

The key point here is Roman Syncretism. The romans believed the world was full of different gods, and they didn't presume to know about all of them, or to know everything about the ones they already recognized. Thus, when confronted with a new god, they would tend either to adopt it into their religion, or equate it with another they already knew. This ...


15

Short answer, no. There is no writing, inscription, artwork, statuary, or anything that indicates Horus (or Osiris) was crucified. There is death and resurrection in Horus' story, though. The Metternich Stele relates the story of Horus dying by the sting of a scorpion. Budge has a nice summary: THE LEGEND OF THE DEATH AND RESURRECTION OF HORUS, AND OTHER ...


13

The shape of the pyramids was indeed influenced by the benben. Here's something I found on Egypt Tour: One of their earliest creation myths envisioned the first place in the world as a mound of earth emerging from the waters of a universal ocean.[...] It seems that the earliest temples of Egypt, particularly in the north, sometimes incorporated a ...


13

He was not a historical person. Those writings were simply credited to Hermes Trismegistus because they were held to be divinely inspired by him. [The author] gave shape and form to the text, but its substance was of transcendent origin. Those who held Hermes Trismegistus to be the author of a text believed that Hermetic tradition embodied a knowledge ...


12

For Egyptian, you'd have several choices. Going from the largest (at least in the Heliopolitian cosmology): Nuun (Nun) is the cosmic ocean that our universe is a bubble in: https://henadology.wordpress.com/theology/netjeru/nun/ Atum includes the concept of "Completeness". In a sense He/She would be related to the universe we know, and precipitated himself/...


11

If there ever was one, we don't know what it was. Most likely, there never was one. The only real original source we have for the story of Atlantis is Plato. He used it as an allegory to help describe his vision of the best way to run things politically. It was sort of his equivalent of Thomas More's Utopia. The society itself appears to be very maritime (...


10

Ouranos (Roman Uranus) is the Greek (night) sky god. You will find him at the beginning of Hesiod's Theogony. Wikipedia has an extensive list of sky gods, among whom you will find the Egyptian goddess Nut.


10

This depends entirely on your stance of if you're asking for a sky god or if you'd prefer only "outer space", so to speak. Given that these are ancient cultures / mythologies we're discussing, it stands to point that perhaps they would have seen the two as synonymous, which was why historically the sky gods were said to be most powerful. For instance, some ...


10

Maybe you should give a link to the version of the myth you are stating , as it is not in the wikipedia article linked below. The only mention about penises is in Plutarch also states that Set steals and dismembers the corpse only after Isis has retrieved it. Isis then finds and buries each piece of her husband's body, with the exception of the penis, ...


9

Short answer: Obviously NOT... Long answer: Each time you see pseudoscience coming and pointing its dirty nose on any subject... Feel free to think smelly things are in the air. First that a trilogy of gods would refer to Isis, Horus and Set. But anyway. Egyptian names The first thing to notice is the use of the GREEK names of the EGYPTIAN gods. Because ...


8

Yes, there is a basis for it. In Herodotus, Book II: Chapter 90 [1] Anyone, Egyptian or foreigner, known to have been carried off by a crocodile or drowned by the river itself, must by all means be embalmed and wrapped as attractively as possible and buried in a sacred coffin by the people of the place where he is cast ashore; [2] none of his ...


8

Looks like the Adinkra "Aya" (fern) symbol: Adinkra is not Egyptian, though. It originates from the Ashanti and Baoulé peoples, in the neighborhood of Ghana and Côte d'Ivoire (respectively).


8

Here is a compilation of various resources to learn ancient classical Egyptian (aka Middle Egyptian) and a selection of various corpus to read. NB: The texts and resources I am quoting here and purely in hieroglyphics, you will not find here hieratic (the "cursive form" of hieroglyphs) or demotic. Also, notice you can learn with them Classical Egyptian, with ...


7

The ka is like the spirit; its the element that makes something alive. In contrast, the ba is more like the personality of a person. The Ka was the life force, astral double or spiritual twin ... the Ba was the impersonal life force of the soul, the essence of one's individuality and unique characteristics. - Ruiz, Ana. The spirit of ancient Egypt. ...


7

The reason for the discrepancy is that Egyptian mythology was not unified even four thousand years ago. There were four major cities, each with their own stories. The egg creation myth is that of the city of Hermopolis, that you've already cited above. Ogdoad is the name of the 8 divine entities of that city's faith. Heliopolis had a different ...


7

THe closest thing to a god of the cosmos in Norse myth would be Ymir, the first being. The ice of the cold realm of Nifhel and fire from the realm of Muspellheim met in the space between, Ginnungagap, to make Ymir. He was suckled by a cow, Audhumla. Another giant was born from between his feet, and a man and woman from his armpit. Later, the god Odin and his ...


7

There is actually an Egyptian goddess named Hathor and he is the god of Solar Eclipses. From this website there are actually many gods associated with the sun: Horus the Hawk is the Sun in totality. The Sun god Atum is the eclipsed Sun passing the second contact of a total eclipse. Ra is the eclipsed Sun shining past the third contact as the ...


7

According to William Petrie in his book The Religion of Ancient Egypt, "...the serious expression and human ways of the large baboons are an obvious cause for their being regarded as the wisest of animals" (22). He goes on to state that Tahuti, the deity of wisdom, personified by the baboon, existed in Egyptian culture throughout most of its early ...


6

I think the primordial Titan Oceanus qualifies. The ocean might seem like an odd choice for a god of the cosmos, until you consider pre-classic era Greeks believed in a flat earth floating in an infinite ocean (personified by Oceanus). This infinite ocean was also where the heavenly bodies rose from and set into, according to Homer: Homer, Iliad 5. 10 ...


6

One thing to remember is that most of the Egyptian creation stories aren't in a nice, neat source. In many cases, they're pieced together from funerary texts, magico-religious sources (spells would link the magician to a similar mythological act), and even 'mythogical manuals' like the Tebtunis and Delta books, which give many different versions of the same ...


6

That is an historical question probably much more than a mythological one, because the Ramses was often depicted very black, they were perhaps black men. The document over shows a clear proof for Ramses III, which founded the XX dynasty. hh is supposedly not related to Ramses I. As in a lot of places there are a lot of controversies about the skin colour of ...


6

Mercury and Hermes are basically the same. The Roman Mercury is simply the Greek Hermes. Now Toth. Toth is a pure Egyptian God. In 300 BC Egypt was conquered by Alexander the Great and one of his generals, Ptolemy became the new Pharaoh forming the Ptolemy/Lagid dynasty (the last Pharaohs). At this time Greeks would collect Egyptian Gods, give them more or ...


6

Egyptian Mythology is not my area of focus, but I'll attempt a high-level answer. Both are associated with the sky, and they even seem to merge in the form of Ra-Horakhty. Merging of gods is not uncommon, as civilizations often need to absorb multiple gods with similar functions and domains. [See Pallas and Athena--in this model, Athena "accidentally" ...


6

Other than the little known Apt, arguably the closest direct Egyptian analog to Hermes would be the synthetic deity Hermanubis. Who is, as you might guess from the name, the result of combining of Anubis and Hermes. He only emerged in Ptolemaic Egypt however, so a little on the late side of ancient mythologies. The combination was rooted in the role of ...


5

The only particular weapon given more than passing mention that I can find is Isis's harpoon in The Contendings of Horus and Seth (part of the Papyrus Chester Beatty I), which she makes herself from some yarn and copper: Then she fetched a skein of yarn. She fashioned a line, fetched a deben-weight's (worth) of copper, cast it in (the form of) a harpoon, ...


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