17

There is some disagreement on this issue. According to Theogony, lines 881-885 (emphasis mine): But when the blessed gods completed their toil and made settlement of honors for the Titans by brute force, they urged wide-seeing Olympian Zeus in accord with the advice of Gaia to be king and lord, and he apportioned provinces to them well. However, in the ...


15

According to Pseudo-Apollodorus, the three brothers drew lots to decide their dominions: But when Zeus was full-grown, he took Metis, daughter of Ocean, to help him, and she gave Cronus a drug to swallow, which forced him to disgorge first the stone and then the children whom he had swallowed, and with their aid Zeus waged the war against Cronus and the ...


13

Well, Poseidon's relationship with Zeus was a rocky one. There have been instances where Poseidon is jealous about Zeus' position as the King of gods. However, the same instance is said to be inspired by a conflict of interests, as Poseidon was not satisfied with Zeus' rule. Poseidon took once part in a minor conspiracy in heaven; for he, along with Hera ...


11

Preface: This subject is complicated by changing social standards. Forced marriage has been routinely practiced around the world into the contemporary era, depending on the society. (This is a major theme of Game of Thrones, as is the condition of women in pre-modern societies in general.) The Rape of the Sabine Women can provide some context. I see three ...


10

In later (hellenistic) times Zeus tended to monopolize all powers and earthquakes came to be his deed. There is a classic book by AB Cook Zeus: a study in ancient religion, part3 has some 30 pages on "Zeus and eartquakes", eg. p.21: The same feeling that the failure of the solid ground can be ascribed to no power lower than the highest prompts the ...


10

Argolis, E. Peloponnesos TROIZENOS Poseidon vs Athena > 1 - 1 In the scramble for patronage over city territories, there's an occasion on which Zeus declared a draw between Poseidon and Athena when these two competed for Troizenos [Troezen]. According to Pausanias' Description of Greece, by Leïs, the first princess of the city, Poseidon became the father of ...


7

Based on Zeus' having rescued his siblings from the belly of their father Kronos; and on the deal that he made with the Titans who eventually sided with him (which is the majority of the Titan population, by the way), starting with his personal bodyguard the four winged children of Pallas and Styx, namely Zelos, Kratos, Bia and Nike; and on his leadership in ...


7

That is a good question. There were several springs on Mt. Helicon, and I suspect the answer is connected to them. I found an interesting suggestion under "Hippocampus" in Wikipedia: The appearance of hippocampi in both freshwater and saltwater is counter-intuitive to a modern audience, though not to an ancient one. The Greek picture of the natural ...


7

In the same chapter "Zeus and the Earthquakes" of Zeus: a study in ancient religion, Vol. III, by Arthur Bernard Cook, quoted by @sand1 in his answer, the author says: In point of fact, the earliest extant description of an earthquake attributes the phenomenon, naively enough, to the action of Zeus, who nods his head, shakes his hair, and thereby ...


6

I can't find a classical source for this, but from what I understand it's related to the myth of the founding of Athens and the competition Poseidon had with Athena over who would be the city's patron. They each created various things and the citizens of Athens ended up choosing Athena for her olive tree. In some versions Poseidon gave them a spring of water ...


5

Poseidon's swaying character often embodies the same traits that the water he rules over displays. Towards Zeus, he is an ally and helpful at times, but can quickly become jealous and angry. Homer's The Iliad provides the best source of information on the relationship between Poseidon and Zeus. In Book Eight : Poseidon's feelings towards Zeus change often (...


4

Poseidon does actually live underwater. From the Iliad: Forthwith then he went down from the rugged mount, striding forth with swift footsteps, and the high mountains trembled and the woodland beneath the immortal feet of Poseidon as he went. Thrice he strode in his course, and with the fourth stride he reached his goal, even Aegae, where was his famous ...


4

Different mythologies being consolidated, mainly. Originally—by which I mean as far back as we have evidence to speculate—Poseidon seems to have been married to the earth-deity Dā. The oldest attested form of his name is Maecenean po-te-da-on, presumably from potei Dāōn, "husband of Dā"; this would make him the son-in-law of Demeter (Dā-mātēr, "Dā's mother")...


4

As yannis pointed out in the comments, Athena cannot be considered stronger than Poseidon, and you're assuming too much here. Poseidon is one of the most powerful gods, along with his brothers Zeus and Hades. Athena is, don't get me wrong, very powerful, but not in the way Poseidon is. The Greeks knew this, as well. First of all: in some versions of the ...


3

Well, it was a temple that just had two separate reasons to be built. Book. Since Poseidon was involved in Athens-Elusis relationship, and Artemis was the Propylaea(1) of Eleusis, so they made one temple to honor both of them. (1) prop·y·lae·um- the entrance to the Acropolis at Athens.


3

While I agree with much of what has been written already, I think there is one obvious aspect that has not been directly expressed. There's a lot of rape in Greek myth because rape happened a lot. The ancient Greeks were engaged in an unusually high amount of warfare, which breeds the kind of anarchy where rape is rampant. Ancient Greeks were possibly more ...


2

His connection is that he created horses. There are different versions of the story, but one of them is that in an attempt to woo Dementer, and so created them out of sea foam. There are also different endings to this, one where Dementer consents and gives herself up to him, another where Poseidon doesn’t love her anymore by the time he finishes.


2

Presumably the other question to which you refer in your own inquiry is "Why would Aphrodite be armed?", asked by @yannis, in which he links here to the 1918 translation of Pausanias' Description of Greece 3.15.10, by William Henry Samuel Jones and Henry Ardene Omerod. Meaning Jones & Omerod's translation here is a bit loose. Pausanias does not really ...


2

One More Wife To complicate the issue yet a little bit further, if we take Plato's dialogue Kritias into account, Poseidon actually has three wives, not just two. According to the description of the foundation of Atlantis in Kritias, Poseidon was married to a certain Kleïto [Cleïto] who bore him five sets of twin sons who ruled the land, which was named ...


2

A technical one; when he teams up with Hera and Athena and traps Zeus and refuses to let him free. "from Kronos’ son [Zeus] the dark-misted, that time when all the other Olympian gods sought to bind him, Hera and Poseidon and Pallas Athene. But that is three gods, not just Poseidon. So if you don't count that, I would tend to say no.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible