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The mistletoe kissing Christmas tradition as we know it seems to have its origin in the 18th century England. Kissing under sprigs of mistletoe is a well-known holiday tradition, but this little plant’s history as a symbolic herb dates back thousands of years. Many ancient cultures prized mistletoe for its healing properties. The Greeks were known to use ...


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Complicated Well, it definitely doesn't claim to be folklore at all, it was just in a book by Thomas Nast. (Linked full size image is over 7 MiB; Wikimedia Commons page; image is in the public domain) Santaclausville, N[orth] P[ole] Another example related to Nast is by George P. Webster: "His home through the long summer months, you must know, Is ...


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From the origins of Krampus, Europe's evil twist on Santa: "Krampus himself historically comes around the night of December 5, tagging along with St. Nicholas. He visits houses all night with his saintly pal. While St. Nick is on hand to put candy in the shoes of good kids and birch twigs in the shoes of the bad, Krampus' particular specialty is punishing ...


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Krampus is from Austro-Bavarian alpine folklore and has his origins in germanic paganism. "Krampus existed in Bavaria earlier than the 17th Century, dating back to the times of a Germanic Paganism. When Bavaria and its neighbours became Christian countries, an attempt was made to rid the land of Krampus. During the Inquisition in the 12th Century, the ...


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There is no historical connection. The cultures that worshiped Asherah were mostly destroyed when the Babylonians invaded the kingdom of Judah and took a large portion of the populace as captives. The last reference to Asherah worship in the Bible is 2 Kings 23, during the reign of Josiah (r. 640 to 609 BCE). Christmas trees became popular in Europe ...


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What are the origins of the Ethiopian Christmas day game of Gena? It is Ethiopian tradition that the country was converted to Christianity during the time of the Apostles. We see in Acts 8: 26-40 that the Apostle Philip baptized a prominent Ethiopian eunuch, who in turn was believed to have evangelized his home country of Ethiopia. We believe that ...


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Santa Claus is derived from the Dutch festival figure St Nicholas, or Sinterklaas. The story is that St Nicholas is a Roman Catholic bishop who rides over the rooftop on a white horse at night, accompanied by his black manservant. While the children are asleep they bring presents, throwing them through the chimney, or the manservant climbing down the ...


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Poinsettias didn't arrive in the United States until 1825. The National Poinsettia Day is celebrated on Dec. 12 in the US, honoring both the plant and the man who brought it to America [source: University of Illinois]. Named after Joel Roberts Poinsett, first United States ambassador to Mexico and the amateur botanist who introduced the plant to the U.S. ...


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There are two streams of narrative in the Santa Claus story, and thus two "appearances". The first, of course, is the historical. Not exactly on-topic here, but you can research the historical figure, Nicholas of Myra, who was a bishop of that city in the third century. Known for his charity, he was recognised as a saint by the Church. Historically, he was ...


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One of the original holidays that was merged together to create the modern Christmas is Yule (in Scandinavian languages, Christmas is still called "jul" or "jól"); this was apparently celebrated around midwinter; the term to "drink yule" appears in the poem Hrafnsm%C3%A1l dated to the 10th century, but it is unclear exactly what the celebrations would have ...


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Well, from what I remember, it was because of the winter solstice, and getting new followers. That's what I remember.... The beginning of the article I'm about to talk about, mentions saturnalia, a roman feast to the god Saturn. Then, there's Sol Invictus and Mithras, which was a feast by Roman Emperor Aurelian. The Mithraists (Mithras) are linked because ...


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